New to All the Book Marketing Stuff?

I came across a post in a book marketing group recently. It read:White teddy bear reading a book

Hello, fellow authors. I have a question. I just published my 1st children’s book using CreateSpace. I was wondering how do you market your book? What helps you get your book out there? New to all the marketing stuff. Thank you for your help and advice.

The members of this particular group are extremely helpful. They advised her to have a website, start a mailing list, create a Facebook page, sign up for a monthly newsletter that offers free marketing tips each month, etc.

It’s human nature to dive right into the “doing.” So much so that we tend to avoid the planning.

The problem is, strategic planning is what minimizes the amount of “doing” we have to do. Consider it the lazy person’s way out of out working too hard.

I don’t know about you, but I’d rather spend a few minutes planning so that I can reduce my workload in that one area, and apply the time and effort to another project. What about you?

First things first

I believe the first piece of advice anyone new to marketing needs to hear is this:

The first step is to figure out two things. Who would be buying your book? And who would be reading your book?

For children’s books, that may be two completely separate people. As the reader gets older, it’s often the same person.

Once you know those two things, start figuring out what they typically do online. (You can often find that information through Google searches.) Which sites do they frequent? What social media platform do they use most? Which apps are they using?

Then start strategizing your approach from there.

Plan your marketing efforts accordingly

Yes, you’ll need a website and a mailing list. Those are givens, in my book. However, don’t waste your time on a Facebook page if your buyers and readers aren’t on Facebook!

(Given Facebook’s TOS, I’m sure the readers of this person’s illustrated children’s book aren’t. However, you may find many of those readers watching YouTube videos. So, how about strategically placing a short ad at the beginning of content they’re likely to watch?)

Instead, spend your time and effort wisely by focusing your marketing efforts where your readers already are. Don’t pull readers away from one place so that they can come where you are. Go to where they already are and introduce yourself to them there.

That means providing content on sites that are already popular with your readers and buyers. You’ll need to experiment with whether a guest blog post, a strategically place ad, or a joint venture makes the most sense. But as you build out these relationships, that decision-making process will become an easier one to navigate. You’ll start recognizing those things that work for you, and those that don’t, much more quickly once you get going.

Every book is unique

So each book’s marketing plan has to be unique to them. But that’s what makes them so fun to create!

Taking the time to learn about the entertainment and buying habits of your readers gives you greater insight into them, sparking further creative ideas for later books you can write or products you can make.

So if you’re just starting out and you don’t even know what options to consider or how to get started, you may find my DIY guide on creating your book marketing plan useful to you as you figure things out. 

 

A Blab with Pat Flynn of SmartPassiveIncome.com for the BiztoBook Conference

Lain Ehmann launched her online BiztoBook conference last week, and there have been some stand-out speakers thus far.

(Frankly, I have to admit, I don’t like the format of the conference. There is as much as 3 hours of content a day, and you have 48 hours to listen to it before it expires, even while new content is rolling out each day of the conference, including over the weekend. I’ve already missed more than half the speakers, which is disappointing. But there is an option to purchase all of the recordings at a discounted rate that ends today.)

Anyway, my personal favorite of the topics I’ve been able to catch thus far was Lain’s Blab with Pat Flynn from SmartPassiveIncome.com and PatFlynn.com.

He’s someone I’ve been following for years now, so it was nice to listen in as he shared some of his recent success in the publishing world.

Pat recently wrote Will It Fly?: How to Test Your Next Business Idea So You Don’t Waste Your Time and Money. This was his first self-published book. (He had an earlier book, Let Go, that was published using a little-known platform called Snippet.)

In this Blab, Pat Flynn shares how he wrote and published his new book, and discussed his astonishment when it reached #1 in the Amazon rankings for various categories, as well as hitting the Wall Street Journal’s Bestseller list.

Listen in to hear what he had to share.

YouTube Famous, Making It Big on the Internet

I recently came across a 2015 book release called YouTube Famous: Making It Big on the Internet by Rosie Matheson.

YouTube Famous by Rosie MathesonIts cover caught my eye, as all good covers should do, reminding me of the old Brady Bunch trailer with colorful boxes, each containing a smiling face that urged you to smile right back at them.

Making it big on the internet?

Isn’t that what so many of us hope to do? I don’t know about you, but I don’t particularly care if it’s on the internet or in real life. Making it big speaks to me of financial freedom, the easy life, and having all the time in the world to spend with my friends and family enjoying the things I love.

That’s luxury to me!

So I explored the book further. It’s description said:

YouTube has revolutionized the viewing habits of millions of people around the world and looks likely to continue doing so. YouTube Famous presents case studies of 20 of the world’s most successful YouTubers providing original content to inspire those who might want to set up a channel of their own – it’s also a book which will be enjoyed by fans. Complete with tips to produce your own programs, it shows how YouTubers built up their channels from scratch and developed content to please their growing fanbase. With a growing online world and more and more people tuning in to the internet, particularly young people, this is the book you need to read for the secrets of success.

The highlighting is my own, and acknowledges what stood out to me in deciding whether to read the book or not.

As I interpreted it, the author would use case studies of successful YouTubers in order to show what sets them apart from other YouTubers who are struggling to figure out how to make their channel work for them. The intent being, to show the reader what the necessary ingredients and steps are to achieving success themselves.

Overpromised and underdelivered

Unfortunately, YouTube Famous overpromised and underdelivered. It read more like a celebrity tabloid than a serious study of successful people. I now know more about who on YouTube is straight and who is gay, who’s dating each other and who’s not, than I anticipated when I first picked up the book.

I’m not too certain how the author came to choose these particular individuals as the best case studies. The author did say that she ruled out anyone who started off rich or has had the backing of any organization with corporate muscle. Yet, a few of the people profiled were sponsored by Skype and other corporations, so I’m not too clear how she’s defining “backing” here.

Regardless, she acknowledges that the people she selected to profile all fit a common mold. They are ordinary people who have built up their channels on the strength of their personalities, their wit and the quality and originality of their work.

As I read through the book it became apparent that most are from the UK, and they all got their start essentially either vlogging about make-up or being comic goofballs and pulling pranks.

The oldest member of the YouTube crew (did I forget to mention, they’re all friends?) was born in 1983 and started their channel no later than 2011, seeming to imply that if you’re older than your mid-30s and didn’t jump on the YouTube wagon long before now, you’ve missed the boat!

Also, it seems that every single one of them has a viewing audience made up of teenage girls. So if you’d hoped for information that might help you reach any other demographic, you’re on your own.

A few more flaws

As far as the tips to grow your own channel that the author promised? It seemed like an abandoned effort. The first few profiles end with a grey box in which you’ll find some tips. But after the first few, there were no more to tips called out for you. They needed to be inferred from the profiles themselves.

Which brings me to another major flaw in this book. With all of the frequent references to the YouTubers, their channels, and specific videos on those channels, the eBook didn’t contain links to any of them. Had it done so, there were a few video descriptions that sparked my curiosity enough to watch them, but not enough to go look for them.

The best of the tips

All that said, here are the best tips that I culled out for myself and wholeheartedly agree with (although they weren’t new to me).

  1. Be yourself and treat your viewers like they’re your friends, not prospects or strangers.
  2. Invite and respond to comment, and let your subscribers be part of the channel’s growth.
  3. And most of all, find ways to collaborate. Every member of the YouTube crew saw significant growth in their number of subscribers when they were introduced to someone else’s audience.

What I didn’t find in the book were the production tips mentioned in the description, as well as information I’d anticipated like the mechanics of growing a channel (looking at viewer consumption data to determine what content to create, how to broadcast videos to get the greatest visibility, etc.).

Instead, most of the YouTubers profiled seem to take a “seat of the pants” approach, either recording whatever it is they feel like or taking viewers up on dares.

While I had personally never heard of any of the 20 YouTubers profiled, their subscriber and viewing numbers are impressive! And they do speak to the fact that YouTube is a different medium than TV. It serves a different purpose and needs to be handled as its own broadcast medium, even as its own art form.

Deliver on what you promise

As for the book itself? I think the publisher got the blurb wrong, and it put the author in an awkward position. The book promised to the reader is not what was delivered, and it appears an editor tried to shoe-horn what the author wrote into what the publisher wanted to publish, with unsatisfactory results all the way around.

Had the book subtitle and blurb positioned it as collection of celebrity profiles of young and famous YouTubers, that would have been one thing (and my review rating would have been different, as it is I only gave it 2-stars on Amazon).

Trying to pass it off as a business book offering case studies on how to create a successful channel was a mistake. To do that would have required a more in-depth look at what made each channel successful, so that the reader could replicate it on their own, and a more varied sampling of case studies.

If you’re over 35 and hoping to reach an audience other than teen girls with your brand, there’s not a lot to go on in YouTube Famous.

The Power of Knowing Why

The first month of a new year has come and gone already and I’m finding myself reflecting on many of the conversations I’ve had of late.

January has traditionally been the goal-setting month, whether it’s a New Year’s Resolution or business goals for the year, many people appreciate the mental “restart” that comes with a new beginning.

From the conversations I’ve been having, though, it seems that many people mistake “goals” with “plans” or “projects.”

If you have ever read about successful people, you may have heard this before.

[Read more…]

22 Ways to Create Compelling Content When You Don’t Have a Clue [Infographic]

The folks at CopyBlogger have done it again! They’re the experts when it comes to creating great content, and this infographic is no exception.

As they acknowledge, even professional writers sometimes get stuck for content ideas. And the same is true for authors and speakers. There are times when the well simply runs dry.

So, what do you write about then?

I’m hoping the ideas that are shared here will help get those creative juices flowing.

And thanks again, CopyBlogger, for always being willing to share!

22 Ways to Create Compelling Content - Infographic
Like this infographic? Get more content marketing tips from Copyblogger.

Nobody Cares About Your Book! Media Training Insights from TJ Walker

TJ Walker is the host of the #1 rated YouTube Channel devoted to Daily Public Speaking and Media Training Improvement, and a prolific fellow instructor on Udemy.icon

Media Training icon

Media Training for Authors: Promote Your Book in the News

I recently came across a course of his that’s geared specifically to helping authors find and prepare for media appearances. It’s called “Media Training for Authors: Promote Your Book in the News.”icon

Of course, from the author’s perspective, media appearances are about selling more books. Right?

TJ is quick to affirm that if you approach the media from that standpoint, you’re going to get nowhere fast.

Nobody cares about your book!

At least, not anyone beyond you or your family and friends.

So, how do you go about securing media appearances when your ultimate goal is to sell more books?

TJ advises in this course that you don’t make it about the book. Make it about the knowledge and expertise that you have to offer to the media outlet and their audience.

I could say a lot of the standard boilerplate stuff about what makes for a good course here. Insert it all. It applies! The production quality is good. The presenter knows his material. He has all the bases covered in terms of what you’d need to know to successfully pull off your first media appearance. It’s all right there.

What makes this course so good?

What I especially liked about TJ’s content was that he designed the course to be more than just a series of lectures with associated quizzes. Instead, he invites, nay, urges, you to stop the videos and practice what he’s just taught.

The only way to improve your on-screen experiences is to practice being on-screen. So, he gives you a variety of exercises to do through which you grow and learn how to become more appealing to media producers. He’ll even provide feedback on your video if you post it in the discussion area.

TJ also teaches you about finding a hook that captures the attention of producers and appeals to their sense of curiosity. These creative news hooks make it easier for you to get what you ultimately want, which is the exposure that a particular media outlet can give you and your book.

Since publishing this post, TJ has offered my readers
an exclusive discount on his course!
Normally priced at $297, you can buy it for just $9!

Buy Now button - http://alewebsocial.com

You’re not always going to be able to work the book into your interview. There will be times when the most you can hope for is the “soft sell” that goes along with having your book mentioned in your bio for the show. But that’s okay. It’s another piece of content that adds to the publicity of who you are and what you’re about.

One of the key take-aways of the media training course was that producers aren’t going to care so much about your authorship as they do about your expertise.

Now, for non-fiction writers, hopefully you’ve written a book that taps into your area of expertise and your media appearances can easily be pointed back to your book.

When it comes to fiction authors, your expertise may be less closely related to the subject of your book. Perhaps it’s about a specific time-period (the one in which your book is set) or about a given marketing strategy.

Regardless, the media is going to be more interested in your expertise, so figure out what that is and how to clearly communicate it to the producers you reach out to.

The more you make your expertise available to the producers and valuable to them, the more likely they are to mention your book. But it has to be about them and their needs first.

This is just one of the many valuable things TJ has to share in this course. He’s been training people to become better speakers and make the media impact they desire since 1984. So he’s not just some fly-by-night “expert” who decided to post a course on Udemy to see what happens.

He backs his course with his own personal guarantee.

If you take the course, consume all the media training content, and do the exercises that he sets out for you to do, and you still haven’t seen the results you’re after, he will give you one full day of his personal coaching for free. That’s essentially a $10,000 guarantee (the cost of a full day of one-on-one coaching with him).

Of course, you have to put in the work. You have to watch the course, do the exercises, follow through on what he tells you to do. But if, after all of that, you’re still not “getting it,” he’ll help you figure it out.

How’s that for a guarantee?

And, if you have questions at any time during the course, just post your question and he will create a video response for you. The sad thing, in my opinion, is how few people are actually taking advantage of his offer thus far! There are currently 1854 people enrolled in the course, but only 2 or 3 people have actually posted a question asking for feedback.

So, what does the course cover?

TJ teaches you how to:

  • look your best on TV
  • prepare your messaging
  • answer questions
  • speak in sound bites
  • eliminate nerves
  • determine if your interview was effective
  • conduct satellite interviews
  • avoid the top three media mistakes
  • how to avoid saying “um” and “uh”

… and more!icon

Media Training for Authors” consists of over 100 lectures (13.5 hours of content!), as well as bonus interviews with publishing legend Dan Poynter, and access to 5 of TJ’s books on public speaking and media training. And if you buy this course using my special coupon code “taraisgreat,” it’s only $9!

Or you can become the media yourself…

He even gets into how to “become the media” if you’re interested in taking that approach to creating publicity. His position is, the more media exposure you get, the easier it is to sell books.

I asked my friend and NYT best-selling author, Jeffrey Hayzlett, whether he agreed that creating your own media works effectively, since he hosts the C-Suite TV Show “Mind Your Own Business,” and his response was:

“If you want to sell books, the best thing to do is have an engaged community. Now if that is your own show—with lots of viewersthen yes. A mailing list of fans and friends, a social media network where you share and have folks interacting. Then all other activations are a big plus—getting on TV, RADIO, REVIEWS, podcasts, book signings—ALL of it.  BUT its only good if you activate it to a network or engaged community.”

Could it get any easier?

TJ’s course isn’t going to teach you how to create that engaged community, but it is going to show you how to come off looking and sounding your best, and that’s a great place to start. I highly recommend that you buy your copy now!

And, hey… While you’re at it, you may find my own LinkedIn Masteryicon courses effective in helping you build that engaged community. Just enter the coupon code “MediaTraining” in any of my courses to receive a discounted price.

Get Greater Distribution for Your eBook Using Smashwords

For many of us who write, Amazon is the default “go to place.” And that’s for good reason! Statistics show that the majority of sales of digital content comes from there.

However, if you talk with any content creator, they’ll always tell you that you need to find as many ways as possible to extend the life (and expand the reach) of your content. That means finding multiple outlets and various formats that the same information can be disseminated in.

I’ve been hearing about Smashwords for years, but have never taken the time to study or appreciate its unique properties.

Smashwords Udemy course coverRecently, I was spending some time on Udemy, looking at the latest course offerings there and looking for those that might be suitable for my readers, when I came across one called “Self-Publishing with Smashwords.”

I decided to scan the content and listen to the promo video, and by the time I was done with that, I knew I needed to take a closer look.

I introduced myself to the instructor, Jason Matthews, who proved to be a very knowledgeable man when it came to self-publishing with Smashwords.

I took the course and, when all was said and done, here’s the review I left for it.

Udemy Smashwords course review

In 26 lessons, Jason walks you through things like:

  • What makes Smashwords special.
  • Formatting your content for Smashwords.
  • How to handle your Table of Contents so that Smashwords likes it.
  • Special considerations when it comes to cover design.
  • How to choose the right file format for uploading your content to Smashwords.
  • The next steps to take after submitting your content to Smashwords.
  • Publishing extras that will make your work stand out from the others.

In all, there’s about 90 minutes of content to the course.

As is my nature, I listened to most of it at 2x speed, so was done in under an hour, including taking notes. But the great thing about Udemy course content is that the platform makes it very easy to speed up, slow down, pause and take notes, rewind to repeat, and anything else you need to do in order to grasp the content you’re consuming.

So, if you’ve been wondering how to go about expanding the distribution of your self-published content, and you want to see your book on sites like Apple, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Scribd, Library Direct and many more, this course may be just the thing you need in order to break through the barrier that’s been holding you back.

I know distributing The Plan that Launched a Thousand Books is definitely on my end-of-year plan to put on Smashwords!

 

The Science of Pricing Your Books Correctly

I’m often asked by authors how to choose the right price for a book, and there are a number of factors to consider.

The infographic from blog-growth.com (below) shares some of the science behind pricing items (whether big ticket or small). But how does that translate to books? [Scroll to the bottom to find out.]

So, how does that translate to books?

Well, let’s start with the formats you want to offer your book in. I often recommend making it available in at least 3 formats. It’s up to you whether it’s eBook, paperback and audiobook or eBook, paperback and hardcover, but give the prospective reader 3 choices.

As with bracketing, you’ll notice that people will tend toward the moderately priced item.

When you reduce the formats offered to only two, as shown in the decoy pricing segment, people gravitate toward the lower cost option (typically your eBook).

While that’s not a bad thing if you can make up the difference in price by an increase in volume, it’s still something to be aware of. (Amazon offers a Kindle pricing suggestion tool that analyzes the best price point for your book based on the volume of sales for similar titles at various price points.)

I have to admit, I’m a little disappointed that The Magic of 9 only tested 4 and 9. I’ve seen some great activity around 7 as well, especially when it comes to courses, and would have liked to have seen that included in the equation. You’ll have to decide if you want to test that out yourself or not.

As far as Deleting the Free Plan goes, that has bearing on the age-old discussion around whether KDP Free Days are a good idea or not. By itself, I tend to think not. However, there are some great strategies that can be used to leverage the visibility of a free book in order to lead new readers into other purchasing decisions. So, done right, the free offers do have a place in your marketing strategy. I just wouldn’t recommend keeping your offer free for extended periods of time unless there’s some other monetization strategy behind the free content.

What are your thoughts? What jumped out at you about this infographic? Is it in line with what you’ve experienced yourself, or have you seen differing results?

Can’t Find the Time to Write Your Book or Are You Just a Slug?

After a presentation I gave recently, an attendee wrote on the evaluation form:

I had no idea all of this existed! I am very interested in writing a book buy cannot find the time. Might it be more helpful when my last child is out of the house? Or am I just a slug?

Of course, the question made me smile, but I know that plenty of people wrestle with the same issue.

They want to write a book.

They want the visibility and authority that being a published expert in their industry affords them.

But finding the time to actually sit down and write seems nearly impossible! A book is a means to an end for them, not the “be all, end all.”

So, is there a solution to this problem?

Of course there is!

Speak Your BookAnd it’s one that actually works well with business experts who want to incorporate their book into the brand.

Oftentimes, an expert talks a million times a day about their subject matter.

They speak as a form of marketing their business and building their brand.

They know their material inside and out so that they can answer questions at the drop of a hat. (Are you liking all the cliches?)

The point is, they know their stuff.

If you’re sitting there reading this, nodding your head, thinking to yourself, She could be writing this about me! you’ll be happy to know that there is a solution to your problem.

You most certainly can write your book. You don’t have to wait until your last child moves out. You simply have to be disciplined and creative, and technology these days makes it easy to do both!

My friend, Ann McIndoo, first introduced me to this concept back in 2012, and I’ve adapted it to fit my own needs and used it frequently since for myself and my clients ever since. I use it for content as short as a blog post, and as long as a book. And you can use it to write your book too.

Here’s the secret: You can speak your book!

What does that mean?

Well, if you spend a little time planning the structure of your book, creating an outline, knowing who your target audience is, you can fill in the gaps by digitally recording its content.

Personally, I use Dragon Naturally Speaking to do that. The benefit there is, it transcribes my speech for me into the written word. (I use the Premium edition rather than the home version so that I can record using my digital recorder, and then come back at a later date and plug it into the software for transcription.)

Sometimes, people prefer to simply record themselves speaking and then have their assistant or a service like Speechpad transcribe it for them.

Either way, the idea is to dictate the book’s content and have it transcribed (real-time or after the fact). With that starting point, you can either fill in any gaps you find yourself or hire a ghostwriter to help you. Then, when the content is all written, be sure to work with an editor to polish things up.

The benefit to “speaking your book” is that you can do it whenever you have a spare moment. I’ve recorded an entire chapter while driving to pick up my kids somewhere or while exercising on my stationary bike. I’ve even recorded blog posts while washing the dishes and folding laundry!

It’s really not that hard to do. And if your business would benefit from the authority that being an author and a recognized expert would lend to it, then what are you waiting for? You’re doing a disservice to your future clients and your brand if you keep putting off writing your book.

One of the greatest benefits of writing a book is that it actually helps you clarify your message, making it easier both to present your brand to others and to fill any gaps in your knowledge or services that you might have overlooked before.

Our sister company, Emerald Lake Books, offers all of the services necessary to edit, design and publish your book when you’re ready. We even do market research as well, if you need help settling on what to write about. So, if you find yourself needing help or encouragement along the way, let us know!

How Speakers and Authors Can Use Mobile Marketing

Today’s guest post is from Sophorn Chhay, an inbound marketer specializing in attracting targeted visitors and generating sales  and qualified leads. Through Trumpia’s SMS and marketing automation solution, he helps businesses and organizations communicate effectively with their customers or members.

Trumpia is offering a free Mobile Marketing Success Kit, so don’t forget to grab your free copy.

Mobile marketing offers many channels for reaching your audience, including reminding them of events and sending them special offers for your next book. It is a great way to add some oomph to your existing marketing strategies and connect personally with your followers.

Mobile marketing for authors and speakersMobile is now the primary way that people connect with the Internet, and you can take advantage of this communication stream to deepen existing relationships with your readers and find new ones.

Here are some easy ways to increase your following with mobile marketing.

1. Create an SMS marketing subscriber list.

SMS or “texting” is one of the top activities that people use a cell phone for. Texting is the most used application on smartphones, with 97 percent of U.S. users texting at least once a day.

Use this knowledge to your advantage by offering an opt-in service for your followers.

Not sure which mobile marketing platform to use? Here’s a comprehensive list of the Top 50 Mobile Marketing Tools and Platforms for Business.

You can use this an SMS service in a variety of ways. For example:

  • Send reminders of new books or upcoming presentations.
  • Let people know when you will be in town.
  • Send out alerts for your newsletter or contests on social media.
  • Inform followers of giveaways and freebies.
  • Offer free tickets to your next speaking engagement if they share your text.

Creative ideas for SMS message marketing are being thought of daily.

You can divide your list in several ways, including by location to let readers know when you will be in their local area for a meet and greet, book signing or convention.

You can also divide the list by genre, if you write or speak in more than one topic area. Send reminders only to followers for that particular genre when events come up.

Additionally, run surveys of your readers to see which of your characters they like best or which book is their favorite.

2. Optimize your website for mobile users.

Now that more people access the Internet from mobile devices than desktop computers, you should optimize your website for mobile.

Optimizing your site for mobile will not turn away desktop followers. In fact, they may not know the difference. Many people go online using both their mobile and desktop device, and can follow you on both.

The best practice for making your site mobile accessible is by changing it to a mobile responsive theme. Talk to your webmaster to see how much work that will be.

Don’t know if your site is mobile responsive or not? Visit the Google Webmasters site to check. And if you don’t have a developer who can help you, feel free to contact us. We’d be glad to do what we can.

Mobile responsive themes respond to a signal from devices, displaying your site in best fashion for each device’s screen size. They also reorder elements of the site in a predetermined configuration. This process is automatic, making the site friendlier to mobile users.

3. Use social media sites that are popular on mobile.

Some social media sites have great apps designed to make them easy to use, making it easier to access information and share content with friends.

Instagram is a mobile-only social media site that is primarily a picture/video sharing site. You can use this to promote your upcoming events and let people get to know the real you. [You do have to upload your images from your mobile device to use this app.]

Pinterest has a very sophisticated mobile app that you can use for letting people know about events, sending out quotes from your books or your inspirational messages, and sending out advance notices of your book covers. It is a very active site on desktop and mobile, and book covers are the perfect size for Pinterest images.

Depending on your topic area of expertise, you can create boards sharing recipes, offering business advice or cosplaying your main characters (dressing up and acting like them).

Facebook is used on mobile for sharing images, videos and text, and can be adapted to mobile easily. Many authors create pages to announce new books, get feedback from readers, and let people know where they are traveling for conventions. You can even send videos of yourself meeting followers or speaking, or ask people to tag you when they post their photos to Facebook of your meeting.

Just a Start

These ideas are just a beginning to the many ways to publicize your work on mobile. You will be amazed at how easy it is to add mobile marketing to your marketing strategy.