Wondering Whether to Trust Review Trust?

We all know that testimonials are a huge part of converting leads to sales. The social proof of someone else saying, “Yes, this person offers excellent service,” takes a tremendous burden off our shoulders.

It doesn’t matter if the item being sold is a product, service, book or talk. What other people say about you matters…

Review Trust - increase salesThere’s a new service called “Review Trust” that allows you to capture those reviews from your shopping cart and website to display them in 10 unique ways where and how you want.

In the past, we’d evaluated other services like this (namely, TrustPilot and Feefo) and found that for the average small business owner, they were cost-prohibitive. TrustPilot runs $299/month for its entry-level package, and Feefo doesn’t even list its pricing although another review site said that its lowest package was £99/month.

If you’re an author, speaker or entrepreneur, unless you’ve got a 6-figure enterprise going, that’s an awful lot of money to shell out each month for reviews.

However, while Review Trust is still in its launch phase, there’s an unlimited lifetime access offer. Once it’s over, though, this service will only be available as a monthly subscription. So if you’re interested in it, our recommendation is to get it now!

Why?

Reviews Offer Social Proof

  1. 70% of people say they look at reviews before making a purchase.
  2. 63% of consumers indicate they are more likely to purchase from a site that has product ratings and reviews.
  3. Reviews increase consumer trust by 12x.

Imagine being able to sell your book on your own website and displaying customer reviews prominently on your book listings?Review Trust book reviews

Why Review Trust?

With Review Trust, asking people for reviews, testimonials and other forms of feedback is simple.

  1. You create a “campaign” for each product you want to request reviews for.
  2. Connect the campaign to the shopping cart system you’re using.
  3. Indicate the type of testimonial you’re looking for (text, audio, video or a combination).
  4. Define a sequence of up to 3 emails to send to the buyer asking for their feedback.
  5. Customize the widget you want to use (there are 14 different types to choose from and a variety of configurations for them).
  6. Implement the widget on your website.

As orders are placed in your shopping cart, the purchases trigger the email follow-up sequence to prompted buyers for a review after they’ve had a chance to enjoy their purchase.

You can also upload names and email addresses of individuals you want to send review requests to as well. For instance, we’re starting by asking past and present clients to write a customer review for our publishing services through Emerald Lake Books. To do that, we’re uploading that information into Review Trust, which will send out emails requesting feedback to the people in our list.

Once a review is written, we can see and approve them to be displayed on our site.

It also affords us the opportunity to address any negative reviews that may come in as well, so it will double as a customer service portal.

We have control over the order in which reviews are displayed so that we can show the most helpful ones first, too. We can even feature certain ones to give them a little extra visibility.

Our Conclusions

Honestly, we see so many different ways we can use this tool to build our business that we’re excited to receive our first reviews. And we’re happy that we got in on this during the launch period because it’s a tool we anticipate using for a long time to come…

That isn’t to say that this system is 100% perfect. We’ve already provided some feedback to the developers on changes we would like to see. (For example, there’s no functionality to send yourself a test email so you can see your email sequence in an email client before sending it out to the world.) But the nice thing about being in early on a launch like this is, we get to help shape the future of the product.

I will admit, there have been other systems that we missed getting in early on. (I still kick myself for not buying WebinarJam when I had a chance to grab the lifetime launch price!) Our conclusion with Review Trust is… Don’t wait! Get it now. You won’t be sorry.

Want to Boost Traffic to Your Content?

If you blog, you need this tool!

MissingLettr is a cross between a virtual assistant and an automated drip campaign, but it’s for bloggers.

And one thing is for certain. If you use it consistently, it’s going to boost traffic to all of your content.

boost traffic using missinglettr

Missinglettr claims to create “strategic, automatic social media campaigns that drive traffic for an entire year. Leaving you to focus on writing your next blog post.”

And that’s exactly what it does (almost!).

I will say that the one drawback I currently see is that it’s not integrated with Facebook yet. That said, Facebook integration is in the works, so I don’t anticipate this being a problem for much longer.

Update: 3 hours after I published this post, Missinglettr announced that Facebook integration should be released by Monday next week (5/15/2017). How’s that for fast?!

As for the rest of the system, though, think about the evergreen content you create.

When you publish a new post, your social media manager (whether that’s you or someone else) has to figure out which content from the post is innately “shareable,” then make up images, then figure out which hashtags to apply to create greater visibility, then schedule out the dates for each post…

It can really bog down the works!

So, many bloggers never get around to sharing a link to their latest content more than 2 or 3 times before moving on to the next post.

All that content and so few readers…

Missinglettr solves that problem for you because every piece of content you write will have a drip campaign set up specifically to create engagement with that content and to boost traffic to your website.

After you create your account, you connect it to your social profiles. Currently, Missinglettr supports Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+. Facebook is due soon, and Pinterest is also on the “Road Map” of future improvements.

The pricing plan you choose determines how many social accounts you can connect with. If you’re just getting started, there is a personal plan that allows you to connect to 4 social media profiles and 2 websites, while managing 4 campaigns per week per site, all for just $15/month.

If you have a larger team, more websites or want to share even more content, you can scale up from there. Ultimately, I’m sure you’ll find a pricing plan that’s right for you.

Once you’ve connected Missinglettr to your social profiles and given it with your blog feed, it continuously monitors your site for new content.

Whenever you publish a new post, Missinglettr scans it and proposes 9 social media posts that can be dripped out over the course of the next year to your various accounts. The proposed posts are complete with images, text and hashtags that are all relevant to the content of your blog post.

You can then edit and approve the posts all in just a few minutes.

Take a look at how easy it is to use!

Missinglettr is more than just a scheduler. It will help you to boost traffic to your site, which will, in turn, translate into more book sales, email sign-ups and client revenue if you play your cards right.

Doc Swiner is Your Favorite Social Media Family Doc

Today’s guest post is from C. Nicole Swiner, MD, whom I recently met through a Facebook group we both belong to. She is a family medicine/general medicine expert (look for #docswiner), covering a broad spectrum of both medical and mental health issues, as well as an author and speaker.

Your Favorite Social Media Family Doc…

…that’s what I like to call myself.

C. Nicole Swiner, MD

C. Nicole Swiner, MD

When I first started practicing Family Medicine, I didn’t even know what Facebook was. I avoided it like the plague, wondering why anyone would want to share their private moments and pictures with strangers on the Internet. But as I began to write articles and started to blog, my husband (who I think is a Marketing genius) encouraged me to consider it more. I was new in my practice, getting ready to start a private practice, and decided to soon write a book, so it made sense. I needed to be on social media. Most importantly, it was free.

I was new in my practice, soon to be starting a private practice, and decided to write a book as well, so it made sense. I needed to be on social media. Most importantly, it was free.

After a while, I became a pro (or addicted, some might say!) and I was on all of the popular social media outlets. I later developed a separate business page just for my medical blogs and, from those, my book How to Avoid the Superwoman Complex was born.

Not many of my colleagues had written a book and most didn’t use social media at the time. For me, it has been a necessary and effective tool for building visibility my book and brand.

I owe the success (and funding, for that matter) of my book to Facebook and social media.

By using GoFundMe.com, I was able to raise money for publishing my book and start taking pre-orders, while the word spread like wildfire. Within a month or two, I’d raised money and pre-sold a large number of books. Thereafter, whenever I sold a copy or spoke to someone about the book, I asked him or her to post a selfie with it and tag me in it. Every time, at least one of their friends asked about the book and bought it. That’s a win-win.

I’ve also become a fan of repurposing one thing and using it in multiple ways on social media to be efficient. For example, I still write my blog, so this is how I repurpose it:

  • I do a live biweekly broadcast on Periscope on a given topic.
  • I have someone transcribe what I’ve said and post it as a blog.
  • I share the blog post on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and LinkedIn.
  • Then I share the article with Facebook groups I belong to, who may use it to post to their collective networks or in a magazine.
  • Soon I’m going to start doing webinars, based on the blog post, and add a Powerpoint presentation to it.

When speaking in the community, I draw topics from the conversations there to discuss with my online following. Why re-invent the wheel?

So, as you can see, I couldn’t do business without social media. It’s another way for me to practice medicine in this tech-savvy world and to reach people I’d otherwise never meet. It’s a must for entrepreneurs of all types now. You’re behind the times if you’re not online.

Put an End to the Overwhelm

I hear it all the time. Authors, speakers, entrepreneurs, designers, photographers, small business owners, Realtors, plumbers, job seekers… They are all facing the same problem.

Marketing is time-consuming! Especially when you’re trying to figure it out as you go.

Actually, the whole thing can become simply overwhelming. Since they don’t know where to start, they often don’t get started or they make slower progress than they want and need to.

That’s one of the reasons that I write this blog.

I enjoy helping people find the tools and techniques that really work.

I like to take a specific issue and figure out the best way of fixing it, so that I can then pass it along to my clients and readers.

Whenever possible, I prefer to test things out for my own needs before recommending them to anyone else. But sometimes the best I can do is research it, knowing the needs of my clients, and let you know which I would choose if I were going to be using it.

Know what you want to accomplish

That exact situation came up recently. I was in conversation with a friend on Facebook who was looking for a magazine designer.

Since there are many different approaches that can be taken to designing a magazine, I asked her some leading questions.

  • Did she want her magazine to be online, in print or both?
  • Did she want to design her magazine online or upload a PDF that was displayed in an online reader?
  • Did she want flexibility in her design (for enhanced creativity) or did she want a template she could work from (for ease of use)?
  • Did she want just text and images in her magazine or other types of content like video, MP3 and ecommerce options?

These were just a few of the questions we discussed.

Find the right tools

In this particular context, my friend was looking at potentially using LucidPress to generate her magazine. I’d also found FlipSnack and suggested she compare the two, along with Issuu, which is a popular online document viewer.

She narrowed down her choices to LucidPress and FlipSnack and asked what I thought of them. So, I took a few minutes to look at the features and functionality of both, and to research a few comparison articles to see what existing users thought of them.

What I found was that selecting the right tool was contingent on knowing how you wanted to use it and what you wanted to get out of it. (Isn’t that always the case!)

A wrench is not just a wrench

A field of nuts with one selectedAs an author, speaker or entrepreneur, it’s important to know, first, what your objective is and then, second, what your preferred operating method is, before making a choice about the tools and platforms you want to integrate into your business.

If the tool makes things harder for you, it’s not the right one.

If it limits your ability to achieve your objective, it’s still not the right one.

Look for tools that are the right fit for you.

Don’t just assume that because everyone else is using it, you should too. Everyone else is not you!

I was commenting to my son recently about the wide selection of socket wrench handles hanging on a hardware store wall. You might think that a wrench is a wrench is a wrench. But that’s simply not true.

There are different size wrenches (1/4″, 3/8″, 1/2″, 3/4″, 1″, 1-1/2″, 2-1/2″ and 3-1/2″ to start with), ratcheting and non-ratcheting, fixed socket or interchangeable, metric, standard and Torx sockets, and so on.

Even if you settle on the specific tool you want, you’ll find that one manufacturer’s handle has a different grip than another’s. And while both may be perfectly usable, one fits your hand better than another.

Use the tools that are right for you

The same is true as you build your business. There are plenty of tools out there to work with. But you need to know what job you want to use the tool for (to make sure it has the right functionality to accomplish the task), as well as which one suits you best.

You could have the best tool in the world, but if it’s not something you’re comfortable with, you’re simply not going to use it!

That’s a frequent conversation that I have with my authors.

Which social media platform should I be on?

What is the absolute best method of marketing my book without a budget?

What’s the one thing I should do every day to reach my audience?

There is no “one size fits all” answer to that. It’s unique because you are you and your ideal reader is your ideal reader. You aren’t everyone else.

That’s why it’s critical to develop a marketing strategy that has you, your offering and your market in mind.

It’s also how consulting a marketing strategist can help you create an optimized plan that ensures that your budget is being applied to the activities that will work best for your specific product, goals and audience.

Fitting the pieces together

Connecting the pieces

So, if you are feeling stuck or if your book marketing simply isn’t getting the results you want, I encourage you to book a strategy call with me and get unstuck! I can help you connect the pieces so that you feel confident about your next steps.

Oh, and if you were interested in the outcome of the LucidPress vs. FlipSnack review, check back next week and I’ll share those results.

 

YouTube Famous, Making It Big on the Internet

I recently came across a 2015 book release called YouTube Famous: Making It Big on the Internet by Rosie Matheson.

YouTube Famous by Rosie MathesonIts cover caught my eye, as all good covers should do, reminding me of the old Brady Bunch trailer with colorful boxes, each containing a smiling face that urged you to smile right back at them.

Making it big on the internet?

Isn’t that what so many of us hope to do? I don’t know about you, but I don’t particularly care if it’s on the internet or in real life. Making it big speaks to me of financial freedom, the easy life, and having all the time in the world to spend with my friends and family enjoying the things I love.

That’s luxury to me!

So I explored the book further. It’s description said:

YouTube has revolutionized the viewing habits of millions of people around the world and looks likely to continue doing so. YouTube Famous presents case studies of 20 of the world’s most successful YouTubers providing original content to inspire those who might want to set up a channel of their own – it’s also a book which will be enjoyed by fans. Complete with tips to produce your own programs, it shows how YouTubers built up their channels from scratch and developed content to please their growing fanbase. With a growing online world and more and more people tuning in to the internet, particularly young people, this is the book you need to read for the secrets of success.

The highlighting is my own, and acknowledges what stood out to me in deciding whether to read the book or not.

As I interpreted it, the author would use case studies of successful YouTubers in order to show what sets them apart from other YouTubers who are struggling to figure out how to make their channel work for them. The intent being, to show the reader what the necessary ingredients and steps are to achieving success themselves.

Overpromised and underdelivered

Unfortunately, YouTube Famous overpromised and underdelivered. It read more like a celebrity tabloid than a serious study of successful people. I now know more about who on YouTube is straight and who is gay, who’s dating each other and who’s not, than I anticipated when I first picked up the book.

I’m not too certain how the author came to choose these particular individuals as the best case studies. The author did say that she ruled out anyone who started off rich or has had the backing of any organization with corporate muscle. Yet, a few of the people profiled were sponsored by Skype and other corporations, so I’m not too clear how she’s defining “backing” here.

Regardless, she acknowledges that the people she selected to profile all fit a common mold. They are ordinary people who have built up their channels on the strength of their personalities, their wit and the quality and originality of their work.

As I read through the book it became apparent that most are from the UK, and they all got their start essentially either vlogging about make-up or being comic goofballs and pulling pranks.

The oldest member of the YouTube crew (did I forget to mention, they’re all friends?) was born in 1983 and started their channel no later than 2011, seeming to imply that if you’re older than your mid-30s and didn’t jump on the YouTube wagon long before now, you’ve missed the boat!

Also, it seems that every single one of them has a viewing audience made up of teenage girls. So if you’d hoped for information that might help you reach any other demographic, you’re on your own.

A few more flaws

As far as the tips to grow your own channel that the author promised? It seemed like an abandoned effort. The first few profiles end with a grey box in which you’ll find some tips. But after the first few, there were no more to tips called out for you. They needed to be inferred from the profiles themselves.

Which brings me to another major flaw in this book. With all of the frequent references to the YouTubers, their channels, and specific videos on those channels, the eBook didn’t contain links to any of them. Had it done so, there were a few video descriptions that sparked my curiosity enough to watch them, but not enough to go look for them.

The best of the tips

All that said, here are the best tips that I culled out for myself and wholeheartedly agree with (although they weren’t new to me).

  1. Be yourself and treat your viewers like they’re your friends, not prospects or strangers.
  2. Invite and respond to comment, and let your subscribers be part of the channel’s growth.
  3. And most of all, find ways to collaborate. Every member of the YouTube crew saw significant growth in their number of subscribers when they were introduced to someone else’s audience.

What I didn’t find in the book were the production tips mentioned in the description, as well as information I’d anticipated like the mechanics of growing a channel (looking at viewer consumption data to determine what content to create, how to broadcast videos to get the greatest visibility, etc.).

Instead, most of the YouTubers profiled seem to take a “seat of the pants” approach, either recording whatever it is they feel like or taking viewers up on dares.

While I had personally never heard of any of the 20 YouTubers profiled, their subscriber and viewing numbers are impressive! And they do speak to the fact that YouTube is a different medium than TV. It serves a different purpose and needs to be handled as its own broadcast medium, even as its own art form.

Deliver on what you promise

As for the book itself? I think the publisher got the blurb wrong, and it put the author in an awkward position. The book promised to the reader is not what was delivered, and it appears an editor tried to shoe-horn what the author wrote into what the publisher wanted to publish, with unsatisfactory results all the way around.

Had the book subtitle and blurb positioned it as collection of celebrity profiles of young and famous YouTubers, that would have been one thing (and my review rating would have been different, as it is I only gave it 2-stars on Amazon).

Trying to pass it off as a business book offering case studies on how to create a successful channel was a mistake. To do that would have required a more in-depth look at what made each channel successful, so that the reader could replicate it on their own, and a more varied sampling of case studies.

If you’re over 35 and hoping to reach an audience other than teen girls with your brand, there’s not a lot to go on in YouTube Famous.

The Power of Knowing Why

The first month of a new year has come and gone already and I’m finding myself reflecting on many of the conversations I’ve had of late.

January has traditionally been the goal-setting month, whether it’s a New Year’s Resolution or business goals for the year, many people appreciate the mental “restart” that comes with a new beginning.

From the conversations I’ve been having, though, it seems that many people mistake “goals” with “plans” or “projects.”

If you have ever read about successful people, you may have heard this before.

[Read more…]

Get Greater Distribution for Your eBook Using Smashwords

For many of us who write, Amazon is the default “go to place.” And that’s for good reason! Statistics show that the majority of sales of digital content comes from there.

However, if you talk with any content creator, they’ll always tell you that you need to find as many ways as possible to extend the life (and expand the reach) of your content. That means finding multiple outlets and various formats that the same information can be disseminated in.

I’ve been hearing about Smashwords for years, but have never taken the time to study or appreciate its unique properties.

Smashwords Udemy course coverRecently, I was spending some time on Udemy, looking at the latest course offerings there and looking for those that might be suitable for my readers, when I came across one called “Self-Publishing with Smashwords.”

I decided to scan the content and listen to the promo video, and by the time I was done with that, I knew I needed to take a closer look.

I introduced myself to the instructor, Jason Matthews, who proved to be a very knowledgeable man when it came to self-publishing with Smashwords.

I took the course and, when all was said and done, here’s the review I left for it.

Udemy Smashwords course review

In 26 lessons, Jason walks you through things like:

  • What makes Smashwords special.
  • Formatting your content for Smashwords.
  • How to handle your Table of Contents so that Smashwords likes it.
  • Special considerations when it comes to cover design.
  • How to choose the right file format for uploading your content to Smashwords.
  • The next steps to take after submitting your content to Smashwords.
  • Publishing extras that will make your work stand out from the others.

In all, there’s about 90 minutes of content to the course.

As is my nature, I listened to most of it at 2x speed, so was done in under an hour, including taking notes. But the great thing about Udemy course content is that the platform makes it very easy to speed up, slow down, pause and take notes, rewind to repeat, and anything else you need to do in order to grasp the content you’re consuming.

So, if you’ve been wondering how to go about expanding the distribution of your self-published content, and you want to see your book on sites like Apple, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Scribd, Library Direct and many more, this course may be just the thing you need in order to break through the barrier that’s been holding you back.

I know distributing The Plan that Launched a Thousand Books is definitely on my end-of-year plan to put on Smashwords!

 

Can’t Find the Time to Write Your Book or Are You Just a Slug?

After a presentation I gave recently, an attendee wrote on the evaluation form:

I had no idea all of this existed! I am very interested in writing a book buy cannot find the time. Might it be more helpful when my last child is out of the house? Or am I just a slug?

Of course, the question made me smile, but I know that plenty of people wrestle with the same issue.

They want to write a book.

They want the visibility and authority that being a published expert in their industry affords them.

But finding the time to actually sit down and write seems nearly impossible! A book is a means to an end for them, not the “be all, end all.”

So, is there a solution to this problem?

Of course there is!

Speak Your BookAnd it’s one that actually works well with business experts who want to incorporate their book into the brand.

Oftentimes, an expert talks a million times a day about their subject matter.

They speak as a form of marketing their business and building their brand.

They know their material inside and out so that they can answer questions at the drop of a hat. (Are you liking all the cliches?)

The point is, they know their stuff.

If you’re sitting there reading this, nodding your head, thinking to yourself, She could be writing this about me! you’ll be happy to know that there is a solution to your problem.

You most certainly can write your book. You don’t have to wait until your last child moves out. You simply have to be disciplined and creative, and technology these days makes it easy to do both!

My friend, Ann McIndoo, first introduced me to this concept back in 2012, and I’ve adapted it to fit my own needs and used it frequently since for myself and my clients ever since. I use it for content as short as a blog post, and as long as a book. And you can use it to write your book too.

Here’s the secret: You can speak your book!

What does that mean?

Well, if you spend a little time planning the structure of your book, creating an outline, knowing who your target audience is, you can fill in the gaps by digitally recording its content.

Personally, I use Dragon Naturally Speaking to do that. The benefit there is, it transcribes my speech for me into the written word. (I use the Premium edition rather than the home version so that I can record using my digital recorder, and then come back at a later date and plug it into the software for transcription.)

Sometimes, people prefer to simply record themselves speaking and then have their assistant or a service like Speechpad transcribe it for them.

Either way, the idea is to dictate the book’s content and have it transcribed (real-time or after the fact). With that starting point, you can either fill in any gaps you find yourself or hire a ghostwriter to help you. Then, when the content is all written, be sure to work with an editor to polish things up.

The benefit to “speaking your book” is that you can do it whenever you have a spare moment. I’ve recorded an entire chapter while driving to pick up my kids somewhere or while exercising on my stationary bike. I’ve even recorded blog posts while washing the dishes and folding laundry!

It’s really not that hard to do. And if your business would benefit from the authority that being an author and a recognized expert would lend to it, then what are you waiting for? You’re doing a disservice to your future clients and your brand if you keep putting off writing your book.

One of the greatest benefits of writing a book is that it actually helps you clarify your message, making it easier both to present your brand to others and to fill any gaps in your knowledge or services that you might have overlooked before.

Our sister company, Emerald Lake Books, offers all of the services necessary to edit, design and publish your book when you’re ready. We even do market research as well, if you need help settling on what to write about. So, if you find yourself needing help or encouragement along the way, let us know!

What’s Your Social Selling Index?

Do you use LinkedIn as a means of building your business? If so, LinkedIn’s new Social Selling Index (SSI) may be of special interest to you.

You might have heard the term “social selling” before. But if you haven’t here’s a quick definition.

Social selling is when sales people use social media (LinkedIn especially) to interact directly with their prospects. Sales people provide value by answering prospect questions and offering thoughtful content until the prospect is ready to buy.

LinkedIn’s new Social Selling Index (SSI) measures the 4 key elements of social selling.

  1. Establishing your personal brand by completely filling out your profile and sharing content regularly through status updates, blog posts and engaging with the content of others.
  2. Finding the right people to add to your network by using available search tools to identify better prospects in less time.
  3. Engaging with insights LinkedIn provides, so that you can discover and share conversation-worthy content so that you can create and grow relationships.
  4. Building relationships to strengthen your network by finding and establishing trust with decision makers.

Your profile is rated daily based on each of these elements to give you a score, as well as recommendations for improvement, and an idea of how you rank in comparison with others in your industry and network.

To view your own SSI rating, visit your Social Selling Dashboard on LinkedIn.

You’ll see the breakdown among the 4 different elements, with scores for how well you’re doing with each. A perfect score is 25. If you have anything lower in a given area, it means there’s room for improvement!

Need some help figuring out how to improve your score? We offer two LinkedIn Mastery courses on Udemy, one on Creating an Awesome Profile and the other on Growing Your Network.

You’ll learn enough in these two courses to significantly shift the needle for all 4 elements of your SSI rating.

And for our readers, we have a special offer good through the end of August.
Use the coupon code “SSI2015” to receive 25% off of either course.

Creating_an_Awesome_Profile_course_listing Growing_Your_Network_course_listing

If you find that your SSI isn’t as high as you’d like, consider taking these courses, ask questions in the Discussion area, and let’s see if we can’t improve your SSI.

Happy Networking!

Remembering What It’s All About

A friend shared a video on Facebook this morning that I found particularly inspiring. Although she shared it in the context of a responsibility that speakers have, the same message applies to authors, to coaches, to artists and to those who stand in a public spotlight sharing their thoughts and ideas with the world, in whatever medium them use.

For some creatives, we get caught up in the process of creating. Passion for our art fulfills and sustains us, and that’s enough.

The problem is, that’s a very self-focused view of what we do.

For other creatives, there’s the ego-boost that comes with having our work recognized, whether through awards or rampant sales.

And once again, it’s a very self-focused view.

That’s not to say that we ignore the business aspects of what we do, because we do need to earn a living in order to keep creating. There’s no two ways about it, unless you’re independently wealthy already.

However, we also have a responsibility. And the success of our business and the reception of our message, no matter what form it takes, can only be assured when we remember who we’re doing it all for.

If I cook a meal that looks delicious, but tastes awful, what have I accomplished?

We need to always remember the experience that we’re giving our audience. They are our customer, whether they’re paying for the experience or not.

It doesn’t matter if, as a speaker, I have an audience of 2 people or 2,000. I have to give the same performance and imbue my delivery with the same energy, because those 2 people deserve my very best.

Quality counts.

I don’t care if you’re self-publishing a book, choreographing a dance piece, giving a presentation at work, performing on TV, coaching a new client, or whatever other unique skill and talent you have to share with the world.

If you don’t take that responsibility seriously, you may as well not do it at all. Or at least, don’t try to build a business around it.

If it’s about you, it’s a hobby. If it’s about the person who’s going to experience what you have to offer, you’ve got a business.

Care to see the video that got me all fired up today? 🙂

Jamie Fox and Steve Harvey