2017 Social Media Image Sizes Cheatsheet [Infographic]

One of the most powerful things you can do to your social media updates to make them more engaging is to ensure they have eye-catching visual components.

With social media changing all the time, the standard image sizes regularly change as well.

Bookmark this handy reference to social media image sizes, created by makeawebsitehub.com, for the next time you find yourself in need of the specifications for your favorite social media site. They’ve even provided Photoshop templates for you to use as well.

makeawebsitehub infographic - social media image sizes cheatsheet

Source: https://makeawebsitehub.com/social-media-image-sizes-cheat-sheet/

Podcasting Has Improved My Life

Today’s guest post is from Michele the Trainer, who is a Mobile Concierge Celebrity Personal Trainer, motivational and educational speaker, healthy lifestyle weight loss coach, and published author with a health and fitness system based on her 3 M’s: Motivation, Movement and Mindset.

Have you ever wanted to do something that looked dauntingly complex and you weren’t sure where to start, or if it was possible to figure it all out?

Moons ago, I bought a podcasting kit with high hopes, opened it up, and it looked so complicated. It was a big box that included unfamiliar wires that were round. It also contained a mixer with some giant headphones and a large microphone.

I would have needed a separate desk or more office space for it. So I closed that box up straight away and shelved it for years.

Soon after I ordered my podcasting kit, it seemed like podcasts suddenly were no longer “the thing.” Fast-forward to five years later they came back, big, and I decided to revisit the idea and see if any of the technology had become any easier. So I asked around.

I’m a terse emailer. I asked a friend a question about podcasting and I received an even shorter reply that was only 3 words, “Evaer and Audacity.”

That email was from my pal Dave Bullis, who produces the Dave Bullis Podcast. (He was just featured this year by Podbean after his 100th episode.)

Anyway, I’m fairly technical, so instead of asking a zillion questions, I installed both of the softwares (PC-based) that Dave mentioned, learned enough of them to be dangerous and I bought that reasonable USB microphone for PC from Amazon based on reviews.

That was the birth of the Michele the Trainer Show and Dave Bullis was my first guest. He taught me more about Evaer, the software I use to record my Skype audio calls, during the Michele the Trainer Show episode 1.

Michele the Trainer Show podcast Ep01 - Dave Bullis

Judy Reagan from Listeners Digest Podcast also chimed in to help me understand a bit about audio editing. She uses a MAC, and I use a PC, so we recorded episode 4 of the Michele the Trainer show about audio editing:

Michele the Trainer Show podcast Ep04 - Judy Reagan

All three of us are technical, which helped the learning curve, but once putting a show together is understood, the rest is really administrative and promotional.

International Women in Film podcastI am no means an audio engineer, but the Michele the Trainer Show podcast has been rolling for awhile. In 2016, I launched the International Women in Film podcast and host it as well.

Because the only equipment I need is the USB mic and some headphones, I can record from anywhere on the planet with my laptop.

My show, the Michele the Trainer Show, is more of a channel because I’m a polymath and didn’t really want to niche. I wanted to try different types of shows within one show and see what would rise above organically.

For example, some of my shows are Interesting Interviews, some are Tool Talk and some are Liquid Hike type shows (named to match my environmentalist nature blog, these shows are about conservation or green tech).

Of course, listing on iTunes requires some category definition.

Like any good ritual we start (exercising, writing, idea listing, etc.), posting podcasts on a regular basis takes discipline.

But that is how I met Tara Alemany, owner of Aleweb Social Marketing! I was looking for new smart guests that had something to teach my audience and we connected. These connections are the best part of podcasting. We take time out of our swamped schedule to create something together that can benefit both of our audiences.

There is a lot of content out there to choose from, so always be respectful of your listener’s time. Plan your episodes and make sure that if someone is commuting they will learn something while listening. 

If you’re looking for a way to really network online and you’re a giver of value, podcasting is a great project. It’s the way networking should be, giver’s gain, and I’ve made a lot of friends since the Michele the Trainer Show launched.

(For more on matchers and givers, I recommend reading the book Give and Take by Adam M. Grant.)

Like blogging, the content is out there and listeners can continue to listen to it as long as it’s available online. So it’s a great way to get your message across and to build your brand.

The Benefits of Podcasting

Here are just a few of the benefits that I have found of podcasting:

  1. Networking: Meeting new people and working together on something. It might be only an hour on the phone together to prep for and record a show, but often we stay in touch and continue to network online.
  2. Giving Value: Reaching out to an audience and bringing value. Providing content on demand!
  3. Hobnobbing with other podcasters: Becoming part of the larger “giver’s gain” podcasting community.
  4. Interesting technology: Learning the audio engineering technology.
  5. Having a platform: Offering other people a virtual ‘stage and microphone.’
  6. Having a voice: For the first time in history there is no gatekeeper. If you want to save the world, now is the time to get your message out there!
  7. Follow the fun: It’s just plain fun to see your own content on iTunes along with Aerosmith and other rock stars. It’s fun to hear your voice on the radios and smartphones of others!
  8. Reach audio learners: Some folks learn more from hearing than they do from visuals or reading, and now you can reach those people.
  9. Learning: I learn so much from everyone I interact with, especially my guests!
  10. Living the DJ dream: It’s just cool to have a show on the internet, just like AM radio DJs were cool back in the day.
  11. Interacting with listeners: This is one of the best parts of podcasting!

Now I’m able to help everyone have a voice.

If you want to start a show, let me know. I’d be happy to help!

A Tale of Two Book Launches: How I Bungled My Second Book Launch after a Blockbuster First One

Today’s guest post is a follow-up article from our friend, Victor Prince, a consultant and speaker who teaches strategy and leadership skills to clients around the world, sharing the very different experience he had when launching his second book from his first.

I published my first book last summer. The launch went better than I dreamed, entirely due to the help of my publisher, my co-author, and wonderful websites like this one that were willing to help. (Thanks again for your kindness in letting me submit a guest blog, Tara.)

Victor Prince headshot

Victor Prince, author of
Executive Farm: A Leadership Fable

I was recently inspired to write a leadership fable as a short story. I self-published it as a 22-page novella on Amazon. It’s about a team of corporate executives who think they are headed to a golf resort for their annual retreat but are going to work a dairy farm instead as a team building exercise. It was my first stab at both fiction and self-publishing. I was excited and confident.

Then I self-published it and realized how different that experience was versus working with a publisher and co-author. I did my homework, so I didn’t make obvious mistakes, like not hiring an editor to review my manuscript.

I was very happy with my book content. I was not happy with what happened with my launch.

Here are the 5 mistakes (or misfortunes) I made in my first attempt at launching a self-published book.

  1. Publishing on LinkedIn – I published my original story as a five-part series over a week’s worth of posts on LinkedIn. I’ve had a lot of luck publishing blogs and building a reader base on LinkedIn, so it was a comfortable choice. I knew it was a non-traditional format for that channel, but I thought that it might give the book more chance of going viral, with each day being an opportunity to catch readers’ attention for all the other days. Unfortunately, the story got little traction after I published it. Worse, because I had published it, I could no longer submit it to other channels as original content.
  2. Timing – After I did research on the self-publishing route and cleared it with my literary agent, I decided to go with Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) program. I got caught up in formatting and reformatting different versions of the PDF as I loaded it into the system. I was excited when I finally got it exactly as I wanted and I hit the button. I didn’t realize that as soon as I did that I also put it on sale on Amazon. Unlike my first book, I didn’t give myself an advance release date to do guest blogging and other things to promote the book’s launch. I suppose I could have taken it down and started over, but I just left it up and decided to do a crash course promotion over the next days. I mapped out a plan and decided to make the best of it. Wednesday, April 20th, wasn’t the publication day I would have picked on purpose, but it was the day I had.
  3. Tragically Bad Luck – I have several websites that are important parts of the platform I use to promote my work. Ever since I built those, I’d gotten a small but steady flow of traffic of people looking, not for information about me, but for a celebrity with whom I share a name. It took me a while to figure out the inbound traffic to my sites from searches for “the sacrifice of victor prince” wasn’t from people seeking to do me harm, but from people looking for a specific song by a great artist. I was about to start promoting my web page with links to the book on my social networks when I heard the tragic news of Prince’s death on the radio. After I got past the shock, I realized that my book launch plans were also a tiny collateral victim of that tragic loss. What had been a constant trickle of traffic to my site looking for information about Prince became a tidal wave. Because I didn’t want to look like I was trying to benefit from the tragedy, I canceled my plans to promote my book via my websites.
  4. The Chicken vs. Egg Limbo – I was inspired to write the book as an homage to my uncles who let me spend my summers as a kid “helping” them on their dairy farms. I wanted the book to have success and good reviews before I presented it to them. But without a launch, I had few initial readers. And with few initial readers, I didn’t want to present them a book that looked like a dud. More importantly, since the book’s characters were inspired by them, I didn’t want them to think it was a statement about them. I was in limbo.
  5. Printed Copies – If my uncles downloaded the ebook on Amazon, they would see the lack of reviews. I figured out an alternative plan – I would get some printed copies that I could send to them. I chose the on-demand printed publishing format Amazon has and was excited until I found out that my book was 3 pages below the minimum to produce printed copies. So much for Plan B.

I have yet to figure out the best path forward from this bungled book launch. Three random readers that have found the book have taken the initiative to email me with great feedback, so I am confident in the story. I am just sad about my failure to launch it.  I’m sure many stories better than mine have died quiet deaths, and I fear this one might as well.

 

 

About the Author: Victor Prince is a consultant and speaker who teaches strategy and leadership skills to clients around the world. Victor’s book, Lead Inside the Box: How Smart Leaders Guide their Teams to Exceptional Results, has been named a Top 20 semi-finalist for 2016 Leadership Book of the Year. See Victor’s other posts on his LinkedIn blog, such as “Lessons Dairy Farming Gave me before my MBA” and “5 Project Management Lessons From my Camino Across Spain.” Victor’s latest book, Executive Farm: A Leadership Fable, is available on Amazon.

 

Doc Swiner is Your Favorite Social Media Family Doc

Today’s guest post is from C. Nicole Swiner, MD, whom I recently met through a Facebook group we both belong to. She is a family medicine/general medicine expert (look for #docswiner), covering a broad spectrum of both medical and mental health issues, as well as an author and speaker.

Your Favorite Social Media Family Doc…

…that’s what I like to call myself.

C. Nicole Swiner, MD

C. Nicole Swiner, MD

When I first started practicing Family Medicine, I didn’t even know what Facebook was. I avoided it like the plague, wondering why anyone would want to share their private moments and pictures with strangers on the Internet. But as I began to write articles and started to blog, my husband (who I think is a Marketing genius) encouraged me to consider it more. I was new in my practice, getting ready to start a private practice, and decided to soon write a book, so it made sense. I needed to be on social media. Most importantly, it was free.

I was new in my practice, soon to be starting a private practice, and decided to write a book as well, so it made sense. I needed to be on social media. Most importantly, it was free.

After a while, I became a pro (or addicted, some might say!) and I was on all of the popular social media outlets. I later developed a separate business page just for my medical blogs and, from those, my book How to Avoid the Superwoman Complex was born.

Not many of my colleagues had written a book and most didn’t use social media at the time. For me, it has been a necessary and effective tool for building visibility my book and brand.

I owe the success (and funding, for that matter) of my book to Facebook and social media.

By using GoFundMe.com, I was able to raise money for publishing my book and start taking pre-orders, while the word spread like wildfire. Within a month or two, I’d raised money and pre-sold a large number of books. Thereafter, whenever I sold a copy or spoke to someone about the book, I asked him or her to post a selfie with it and tag me in it. Every time, at least one of their friends asked about the book and bought it. That’s a win-win.

I’ve also become a fan of repurposing one thing and using it in multiple ways on social media to be efficient. For example, I still write my blog, so this is how I repurpose it:

  • I do a live biweekly broadcast on Periscope on a given topic.
  • I have someone transcribe what I’ve said and post it as a blog.
  • I share the blog post on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and LinkedIn.
  • Then I share the article with Facebook groups I belong to, who may use it to post to their collective networks or in a magazine.
  • Soon I’m going to start doing webinars, based on the blog post, and add a Powerpoint presentation to it.

When speaking in the community, I draw topics from the conversations there to discuss with my online following. Why re-invent the wheel?

So, as you can see, I couldn’t do business without social media. It’s another way for me to practice medicine in this tech-savvy world and to reach people I’d otherwise never meet. It’s a must for entrepreneurs of all types now. You’re behind the times if you’re not online.

A Blab with Pat Flynn of SmartPassiveIncome.com for the BiztoBook Conference

Lain Ehmann launched her online BiztoBook conference last week, and there have been some stand-out speakers thus far.

(Frankly, I have to admit, I don’t like the format of the conference. There is as much as 3 hours of content a day, and you have 48 hours to listen to it before it expires, even while new content is rolling out each day of the conference, including over the weekend. I’ve already missed more than half the speakers, which is disappointing. But there is an option to purchase all of the recordings at a discounted rate that ends today.)

Anyway, my personal favorite of the topics I’ve been able to catch thus far was Lain’s Blab with Pat Flynn from SmartPassiveIncome.com and PatFlynn.com.

He’s someone I’ve been following for years now, so it was nice to listen in as he shared some of his recent success in the publishing world.

Pat recently wrote Will It Fly?: How to Test Your Next Business Idea So You Don’t Waste Your Time and Money. This was his first self-published book. (He had an earlier book, Let Go, that was published using a little-known platform called Snippet.)

In this Blab, Pat Flynn shares how he wrote and published his new book, and discussed his astonishment when it reached #1 in the Amazon rankings for various categories, as well as hitting the Wall Street Journal’s Bestseller list.

Listen in to hear what he had to share.

YouTube Famous, Making It Big on the Internet

I recently came across a 2015 book release called YouTube Famous: Making It Big on the Internet by Rosie Matheson.

YouTube Famous by Rosie MathesonIts cover caught my eye, as all good covers should do, reminding me of the old Brady Bunch trailer with colorful boxes, each containing a smiling face that urged you to smile right back at them.

Making it big on the internet?

Isn’t that what so many of us hope to do? I don’t know about you, but I don’t particularly care if it’s on the internet or in real life. Making it big speaks to me of financial freedom, the easy life, and having all the time in the world to spend with my friends and family enjoying the things I love.

That’s luxury to me!

So I explored the book further. It’s description said:

YouTube has revolutionized the viewing habits of millions of people around the world and looks likely to continue doing so. YouTube Famous presents case studies of 20 of the world’s most successful YouTubers providing original content to inspire those who might want to set up a channel of their own – it’s also a book which will be enjoyed by fans. Complete with tips to produce your own programs, it shows how YouTubers built up their channels from scratch and developed content to please their growing fanbase. With a growing online world and more and more people tuning in to the internet, particularly young people, this is the book you need to read for the secrets of success.

The highlighting is my own, and acknowledges what stood out to me in deciding whether to read the book or not.

As I interpreted it, the author would use case studies of successful YouTubers in order to show what sets them apart from other YouTubers who are struggling to figure out how to make their channel work for them. The intent being, to show the reader what the necessary ingredients and steps are to achieving success themselves.

Overpromised and underdelivered

Unfortunately, YouTube Famous overpromised and underdelivered. It read more like a celebrity tabloid than a serious study of successful people. I now know more about who on YouTube is straight and who is gay, who’s dating each other and who’s not, than I anticipated when I first picked up the book.

I’m not too certain how the author came to choose these particular individuals as the best case studies. The author did say that she ruled out anyone who started off rich or has had the backing of any organization with corporate muscle. Yet, a few of the people profiled were sponsored by Skype and other corporations, so I’m not too clear how she’s defining “backing” here.

Regardless, she acknowledges that the people she selected to profile all fit a common mold. They are ordinary people who have built up their channels on the strength of their personalities, their wit and the quality and originality of their work.

As I read through the book it became apparent that most are from the UK, and they all got their start essentially either vlogging about make-up or being comic goofballs and pulling pranks.

The oldest member of the YouTube crew (did I forget to mention, they’re all friends?) was born in 1983 and started their channel no later than 2011, seeming to imply that if you’re older than your mid-30s and didn’t jump on the YouTube wagon long before now, you’ve missed the boat!

Also, it seems that every single one of them has a viewing audience made up of teenage girls. So if you’d hoped for information that might help you reach any other demographic, you’re on your own.

A few more flaws

As far as the tips to grow your own channel that the author promised? It seemed like an abandoned effort. The first few profiles end with a grey box in which you’ll find some tips. But after the first few, there were no more to tips called out for you. They needed to be inferred from the profiles themselves.

Which brings me to another major flaw in this book. With all of the frequent references to the YouTubers, their channels, and specific videos on those channels, the eBook didn’t contain links to any of them. Had it done so, there were a few video descriptions that sparked my curiosity enough to watch them, but not enough to go look for them.

The best of the tips

All that said, here are the best tips that I culled out for myself and wholeheartedly agree with (although they weren’t new to me).

  1. Be yourself and treat your viewers like they’re your friends, not prospects or strangers.
  2. Invite and respond to comment, and let your subscribers be part of the channel’s growth.
  3. And most of all, find ways to collaborate. Every member of the YouTube crew saw significant growth in their number of subscribers when they were introduced to someone else’s audience.

What I didn’t find in the book were the production tips mentioned in the description, as well as information I’d anticipated like the mechanics of growing a channel (looking at viewer consumption data to determine what content to create, how to broadcast videos to get the greatest visibility, etc.).

Instead, most of the YouTubers profiled seem to take a “seat of the pants” approach, either recording whatever it is they feel like or taking viewers up on dares.

While I had personally never heard of any of the 20 YouTubers profiled, their subscriber and viewing numbers are impressive! And they do speak to the fact that YouTube is a different medium than TV. It serves a different purpose and needs to be handled as its own broadcast medium, even as its own art form.

Deliver on what you promise

As for the book itself? I think the publisher got the blurb wrong, and it put the author in an awkward position. The book promised to the reader is not what was delivered, and it appears an editor tried to shoe-horn what the author wrote into what the publisher wanted to publish, with unsatisfactory results all the way around.

Had the book subtitle and blurb positioned it as collection of celebrity profiles of young and famous YouTubers, that would have been one thing (and my review rating would have been different, as it is I only gave it 2-stars on Amazon).

Trying to pass it off as a business book offering case studies on how to create a successful channel was a mistake. To do that would have required a more in-depth look at what made each channel successful, so that the reader could replicate it on their own, and a more varied sampling of case studies.

If you’re over 35 and hoping to reach an audience other than teen girls with your brand, there’s not a lot to go on in YouTube Famous.

How Speakers and Authors Can Use Mobile Marketing

Today’s guest post is from Sophorn Chhay, an inbound marketer specializing in attracting targeted visitors and generating sales  and qualified leads. Through Trumpia’s SMS and marketing automation solution, he helps businesses and organizations communicate effectively with their customers or members.

Trumpia is offering a free Mobile Marketing Success Kit, so don’t forget to grab your free copy.

Mobile marketing offers many channels for reaching your audience, including reminding them of events and sending them special offers for your next book. It is a great way to add some oomph to your existing marketing strategies and connect personally with your followers.

Mobile marketing for authors and speakersMobile is now the primary way that people connect with the Internet, and you can take advantage of this communication stream to deepen existing relationships with your readers and find new ones.

Here are some easy ways to increase your following with mobile marketing.

1. Create an SMS marketing subscriber list.

SMS or “texting” is one of the top activities that people use a cell phone for. Texting is the most used application on smartphones, with 97 percent of U.S. users texting at least once a day.

Use this knowledge to your advantage by offering an opt-in service for your followers.

Not sure which mobile marketing platform to use? Here’s a comprehensive list of the Top 50 Mobile Marketing Tools and Platforms for Business.

You can use this an SMS service in a variety of ways. For example:

  • Send reminders of new books or upcoming presentations.
  • Let people know when you will be in town.
  • Send out alerts for your newsletter or contests on social media.
  • Inform followers of giveaways and freebies.
  • Offer free tickets to your next speaking engagement if they share your text.

Creative ideas for SMS message marketing are being thought of daily.

You can divide your list in several ways, including by location to let readers know when you will be in their local area for a meet and greet, book signing or convention.

You can also divide the list by genre, if you write or speak in more than one topic area. Send reminders only to followers for that particular genre when events come up.

Additionally, run surveys of your readers to see which of your characters they like best or which book is their favorite.

2. Optimize your website for mobile users.

Now that more people access the Internet from mobile devices than desktop computers, you should optimize your website for mobile.

Optimizing your site for mobile will not turn away desktop followers. In fact, they may not know the difference. Many people go online using both their mobile and desktop device, and can follow you on both.

The best practice for making your site mobile accessible is by changing it to a mobile responsive theme. Talk to your webmaster to see how much work that will be.

Don’t know if your site is mobile responsive or not? Visit the Google Webmasters site to check. And if you don’t have a developer who can help you, feel free to contact us. We’d be glad to do what we can.

Mobile responsive themes respond to a signal from devices, displaying your site in best fashion for each device’s screen size. They also reorder elements of the site in a predetermined configuration. This process is automatic, making the site friendlier to mobile users.

3. Use social media sites that are popular on mobile.

Some social media sites have great apps designed to make them easy to use, making it easier to access information and share content with friends.

Instagram is a mobile-only social media site that is primarily a picture/video sharing site. You can use this to promote your upcoming events and let people get to know the real you. [You do have to upload your images from your mobile device to use this app.]

Pinterest has a very sophisticated mobile app that you can use for letting people know about events, sending out quotes from your books or your inspirational messages, and sending out advance notices of your book covers. It is a very active site on desktop and mobile, and book covers are the perfect size for Pinterest images.

Depending on your topic area of expertise, you can create boards sharing recipes, offering business advice or cosplaying your main characters (dressing up and acting like them).

Facebook is used on mobile for sharing images, videos and text, and can be adapted to mobile easily. Many authors create pages to announce new books, get feedback from readers, and let people know where they are traveling for conventions. You can even send videos of yourself meeting followers or speaking, or ask people to tag you when they post their photos to Facebook of your meeting.

Just a Start

These ideas are just a beginning to the many ways to publicize your work on mobile. You will be amazed at how easy it is to add mobile marketing to your marketing strategy.

 

What’s Your Social Selling Index?

Do you use LinkedIn as a means of building your business? If so, LinkedIn’s new Social Selling Index (SSI) may be of special interest to you.

You might have heard the term “social selling” before. But if you haven’t here’s a quick definition.

Social selling is when sales people use social media (LinkedIn especially) to interact directly with their prospects. Sales people provide value by answering prospect questions and offering thoughtful content until the prospect is ready to buy.

LinkedIn’s new Social Selling Index (SSI) measures the 4 key elements of social selling.

  1. Establishing your personal brand by completely filling out your profile and sharing content regularly through status updates, blog posts and engaging with the content of others.
  2. Finding the right people to add to your network by using available search tools to identify better prospects in less time.
  3. Engaging with insights LinkedIn provides, so that you can discover and share conversation-worthy content so that you can create and grow relationships.
  4. Building relationships to strengthen your network by finding and establishing trust with decision makers.

Your profile is rated daily based on each of these elements to give you a score, as well as recommendations for improvement, and an idea of how you rank in comparison with others in your industry and network.

To view your own SSI rating, visit your Social Selling Dashboard on LinkedIn.

You’ll see the breakdown among the 4 different elements, with scores for how well you’re doing with each. A perfect score is 25. If you have anything lower in a given area, it means there’s room for improvement!

Need some help figuring out how to improve your score? We offer two LinkedIn Mastery courses on Udemy, one on Creating an Awesome Profile and the other on Growing Your Network.

You’ll learn enough in these two courses to significantly shift the needle for all 4 elements of your SSI rating.

And for our readers, we have a special offer good through the end of August.
Use the coupon code “SSI2015” to receive 25% off of either course.

Creating_an_Awesome_Profile_course_listing Growing_Your_Network_course_listing

If you find that your SSI isn’t as high as you’d like, consider taking these courses, ask questions in the Discussion area, and let’s see if we can’t improve your SSI.

Happy Networking!

5 Steps to Success in Social Marketing Your First Book

”This is the first time that I’ve offered someone a Featured Author interview with whom I had no prior relationship.

Victor Prince headshotHowever, when Victor Prince reached out to me last April to see if I might support his book launch in mid-July, he did everything exactly how I tell my clients to do it.

  • He provided plenty of time.
  • He explained what his book was and why it was important.
  • He shared with me what he was offering to do.
  • He told me clearly what was in it for me, as well as for my readers.
  • He made it clear that he was willing to bend over backwards to make the whole thing as easy as possible on me.

Victor had reached out to me, I believe, because I’d co-authored a book in the same niche as the one he’s releasing, leadership. His co-author, Mike Figliuolo, had even endorsed it.

And while Victor’s original vision for how we might collaborate wasn’t exactly what fit my needs, I was impressed enough with how he was conducting his book launch outreach efforts that I asked him to share some insights with my readers.

So, here’s what he had to say… [Read more…]

Animoto’s 2015 Video Marketing Cheat Sheet [Infographic]

According to a recent study by Animoto, more than 7 billion videos watched each and every day on Facebook and YouTube.

You can read the press release about the Animoto Online and Social Video Marketing Study to learn more.

However, one thing is clear…

If video content isn’t part of your marketing strategy, you’re missing out! And Animoto is a great way to get started…

Consider this:

  • 4 times as many consumers would rather watch a video about a product than read about it.
  • Customers are nearly 50% more likely to read email newsletters that include links to video.
  • 4 in 5 consumers say a video showing how a product or service works (or what it’s about) is important.

Remember, your book is your product. Your name is your brand. You are your company.

So, how are you going to use video to promote your topic? Share in the comments below!

”2015