Want to Boost Traffic to Your Content?

If you blog, you need this tool!

MissingLettr is a cross between a virtual assistant and an automated drip campaign, but it’s for bloggers.

And one thing is for certain. If you use it consistently, it’s going to boost traffic to all of your content.

boost traffic using missinglettr

Missinglettr claims to create “strategic, automatic social media campaigns that drive traffic for an entire year. Leaving you to focus on writing your next blog post.”

And that’s exactly what it does (almost!).

I will say that the one drawback I currently see is that it’s not integrated with Facebook yet. That said, Facebook integration is in the works, so I don’t anticipate this being a problem for much longer.

Update: 3 hours after I published this post, Missinglettr announced that Facebook integration should be released by Monday next week (5/15/2017). How’s that for fast?!

As for the rest of the system, though, think about the evergreen content you create.

When you publish a new post, your social media manager (whether that’s you or someone else) has to figure out which content from the post is innately “shareable,” then make up images, then figure out which hashtags to apply to create greater visibility, then schedule out the dates for each post…

It can really bog down the works!

So, many bloggers never get around to sharing a link to their latest content more than 2 or 3 times before moving on to the next post.

All that content and so few readers…

Missinglettr solves that problem for you because every piece of content you write will have a drip campaign set up specifically to create engagement with that content and to boost traffic to your website.

After you create your account, you connect it to your social profiles. Currently, Missinglettr supports Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+. Facebook is due soon, and Pinterest is also on the “Road Map” of future improvements.

The pricing plan you choose determines how many social accounts you can connect with. If you’re just getting started, there is a personal plan that allows you to connect to 4 social media profiles and 2 websites, while managing 4 campaigns per week per site, all for just $15/month.

If you have a larger team, more websites or want to share even more content, you can scale up from there. Ultimately, I’m sure you’ll find a pricing plan that’s right for you.

Once you’ve connected Missinglettr to your social profiles and given it with your blog feed, it continuously monitors your site for new content.

Whenever you publish a new post, Missinglettr scans it and proposes 9 social media posts that can be dripped out over the course of the next year to your various accounts. The proposed posts are complete with images, text and hashtags that are all relevant to the content of your blog post.

You can then edit and approve the posts all in just a few minutes.

Take a look at how easy it is to use!

Missinglettr is more than just a scheduler. It will help you to boost traffic to your site, which will, in turn, translate into more book sales, email sign-ups and client revenue if you play your cards right.

2017 Social Media Image Sizes Cheatsheet [Infographic]

One of the most powerful things you can do to your social media updates to make them more engaging is to ensure they have eye-catching visual components.

With social media changing all the time, the standard image sizes regularly change as well.

Bookmark this handy reference to social media image sizes, created by makeawebsitehub.com, for the next time you find yourself in need of the specifications for your favorite social media site. They’ve even provided Photoshop templates for you to use as well.

makeawebsitehub infographic - social media image sizes cheatsheet

Source: https://makeawebsitehub.com/social-media-image-sizes-cheat-sheet/

A Tale of Two Book Launches: How I Bungled My Second Book Launch after a Blockbuster First One

Today’s guest post is a follow-up article from our friend, Victor Prince, a consultant and speaker who teaches strategy and leadership skills to clients around the world, sharing the very different experience he had when launching his second book from his first.

I published my first book last summer. The launch went better than I dreamed, entirely due to the help of my publisher, my co-author, and wonderful websites like this one that were willing to help. (Thanks again for your kindness in letting me submit a guest blog, Tara.)

Victor Prince headshot

Victor Prince, author of
Executive Farm: A Leadership Fable

I was recently inspired to write a leadership fable as a short story. I self-published it as a 22-page novella on Amazon. It’s about a team of corporate executives who think they are headed to a golf resort for their annual retreat but are going to work a dairy farm instead as a team building exercise. It was my first stab at both fiction and self-publishing. I was excited and confident.

Then I self-published it and realized how different that experience was versus working with a publisher and co-author. I did my homework, so I didn’t make obvious mistakes, like not hiring an editor to review my manuscript.

I was very happy with my book content. I was not happy with what happened with my launch.

Here are the 5 mistakes (or misfortunes) I made in my first attempt at launching a self-published book.

  1. Publishing on LinkedIn – I published my original story as a five-part series over a week’s worth of posts on LinkedIn. I’ve had a lot of luck publishing blogs and building a reader base on LinkedIn, so it was a comfortable choice. I knew it was a non-traditional format for that channel, but I thought that it might give the book more chance of going viral, with each day being an opportunity to catch readers’ attention for all the other days. Unfortunately, the story got little traction after I published it. Worse, because I had published it, I could no longer submit it to other channels as original content.
  2. Timing – After I did research on the self-publishing route and cleared it with my literary agent, I decided to go with Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) program. I got caught up in formatting and reformatting different versions of the PDF as I loaded it into the system. I was excited when I finally got it exactly as I wanted and I hit the button. I didn’t realize that as soon as I did that I also put it on sale on Amazon. Unlike my first book, I didn’t give myself an advance release date to do guest blogging and other things to promote the book’s launch. I suppose I could have taken it down and started over, but I just left it up and decided to do a crash course promotion over the next days. I mapped out a plan and decided to make the best of it. Wednesday, April 20th, wasn’t the publication day I would have picked on purpose, but it was the day I had.
  3. Tragically Bad Luck – I have several websites that are important parts of the platform I use to promote my work. Ever since I built those, I’d gotten a small but steady flow of traffic of people looking, not for information about me, but for a celebrity with whom I share a name. It took me a while to figure out the inbound traffic to my sites from searches for “the sacrifice of victor prince” wasn’t from people seeking to do me harm, but from people looking for a specific song by a great artist. I was about to start promoting my web page with links to the book on my social networks when I heard the tragic news of Prince’s death on the radio. After I got past the shock, I realized that my book launch plans were also a tiny collateral victim of that tragic loss. What had been a constant trickle of traffic to my site looking for information about Prince became a tidal wave. Because I didn’t want to look like I was trying to benefit from the tragedy, I canceled my plans to promote my book via my websites.
  4. The Chicken vs. Egg Limbo – I was inspired to write the book as an homage to my uncles who let me spend my summers as a kid “helping” them on their dairy farms. I wanted the book to have success and good reviews before I presented it to them. But without a launch, I had few initial readers. And with few initial readers, I didn’t want to present them a book that looked like a dud. More importantly, since the book’s characters were inspired by them, I didn’t want them to think it was a statement about them. I was in limbo.
  5. Printed Copies – If my uncles downloaded the ebook on Amazon, they would see the lack of reviews. I figured out an alternative plan – I would get some printed copies that I could send to them. I chose the on-demand printed publishing format Amazon has and was excited until I found out that my book was 3 pages below the minimum to produce printed copies. So much for Plan B.

I have yet to figure out the best path forward from this bungled book launch. Three random readers that have found the book have taken the initiative to email me with great feedback, so I am confident in the story. I am just sad about my failure to launch it.  I’m sure many stories better than mine have died quiet deaths, and I fear this one might as well.

 

 

About the Author: Victor Prince is a consultant and speaker who teaches strategy and leadership skills to clients around the world. Victor’s book, Lead Inside the Box: How Smart Leaders Guide their Teams to Exceptional Results, has been named a Top 20 semi-finalist for 2016 Leadership Book of the Year. See Victor’s other posts on his LinkedIn blog, such as “Lessons Dairy Farming Gave me before my MBA” and “5 Project Management Lessons From my Camino Across Spain.” Victor’s latest book, Executive Farm: A Leadership Fable, is available on Amazon.

 

What’s Your Social Selling Index?

Do you use LinkedIn as a means of building your business? If so, LinkedIn’s new Social Selling Index (SSI) may be of special interest to you.

You might have heard the term “social selling” before. But if you haven’t here’s a quick definition.

Social selling is when sales people use social media (LinkedIn especially) to interact directly with their prospects. Sales people provide value by answering prospect questions and offering thoughtful content until the prospect is ready to buy.

LinkedIn’s new Social Selling Index (SSI) measures the 4 key elements of social selling.

  1. Establishing your personal brand by completely filling out your profile and sharing content regularly through status updates, blog posts and engaging with the content of others.
  2. Finding the right people to add to your network by using available search tools to identify better prospects in less time.
  3. Engaging with insights LinkedIn provides, so that you can discover and share conversation-worthy content so that you can create and grow relationships.
  4. Building relationships to strengthen your network by finding and establishing trust with decision makers.

Your profile is rated daily based on each of these elements to give you a score, as well as recommendations for improvement, and an idea of how you rank in comparison with others in your industry and network.

To view your own SSI rating, visit your Social Selling Dashboard on LinkedIn.

You’ll see the breakdown among the 4 different elements, with scores for how well you’re doing with each. A perfect score is 25. If you have anything lower in a given area, it means there’s room for improvement!

Need some help figuring out how to improve your score? We offer two LinkedIn Mastery courses on Udemy, one on Creating an Awesome Profile and the other on Growing Your Network.

You’ll learn enough in these two courses to significantly shift the needle for all 4 elements of your SSI rating.

And for our readers, we have a special offer good through the end of August.
Use the coupon code “SSI2015” to receive 25% off of either course.

Creating_an_Awesome_Profile_course_listing Growing_Your_Network_course_listing

If you find that your SSI isn’t as high as you’d like, consider taking these courses, ask questions in the Discussion area, and let’s see if we can’t improve your SSI.

Happy Networking!

5 Steps to Success in Social Marketing Your First Book

”This is the first time that I’ve offered someone a Featured Author interview with whom I had no prior relationship.

Victor Prince headshotHowever, when Victor Prince reached out to me last April to see if I might support his book launch in mid-July, he did everything exactly how I tell my clients to do it.

  • He provided plenty of time.
  • He explained what his book was and why it was important.
  • He shared with me what he was offering to do.
  • He told me clearly what was in it for me, as well as for my readers.
  • He made it clear that he was willing to bend over backwards to make the whole thing as easy as possible on me.

Victor had reached out to me, I believe, because I’d co-authored a book in the same niche as the one he’s releasing, leadership. His co-author, Mike Figliuolo, had even endorsed it.

And while Victor’s original vision for how we might collaborate wasn’t exactly what fit my needs, I was impressed enough with how he was conducting his book launch outreach efforts that I asked him to share some insights with my readers.

So, here’s what he had to say… [Read more…]

5 Tools to Manage Your Social Media Content

Part of building your online presence, whether you’re an author, business owner, consultant, speaker or even an astronaut, is to keep it flowing with interesting content.

It’s all well and good to set up your profiles on each of the hot social networks out there, but then what do you do with them?

This topic came up recently in a Facebook group I’m part of, so I thought I’d share with my readers some of the tools and techniques I use to keep content flowing smoothly, even when my schedule is choppy.

Keep in mind that every social network has a different posting etiquette. Twitter, with its speed, requires more posts in a day to remain visible and relevant than, say, Facebook (although there are some studies that show that’s beginning to change to combat Facebook’s reticence to share page posts).

So, the tools I use are configured in such a way to ensure that I’m posting to the appropriate network at a pace and on a schedule that suits that social network.

That said, here are 5 tools and techniques I use for maintaining a flow of content for my followers. [Read more…]

Want to Master LinkedIn? Now’s Your Chance!

As I mentioned in my book, The Plan that Launched a Thousand Books, LinkedIn is a great resource no matter what profession you are in. The groups provide a wealth of information and collaboration opportunities. The blogs expose you to a wide variety of topics and interests.

And the people? As with any networking opportunity, there’s a wide array of personalities and professions.

As a speaker, I love connecting with event planners and audience members there.

As an author and publisher, I enjoy sharing ideas with others who are going through the same trial and error to learn how to market their books in the best ways possible.

I’ve taught thousands of people how to get the most out of LinkedIn over the years, and now I’d like to teach you.

Whatever your professional objective (to find a new job, advance your career, or sell more books), my LinkedIn Mastery courses will get you headed in the right direction. [Read more…]

An Interview with Brian Jud, Executive Director of the Association of Publishers for Special Sales

This month’s Featured Author interview is with Brian Jud, an incredibly resourceful author who is extremely active in the publishing world. As an industry expert, he conducts monthly Book Marketing 201® webinars for the Association of Publishers for Special Sales, an organization that he is the Executive Director of, as well as conducting the Book Marketing Monthly® webinars for CreateSpace. He also is co-owner of the Premium Book Company and owner of Book Marketing Works.

Brian Jud - Association of Publishers for Special SalesSuffice it to say, Brian eats, sleeps and breathes publishing and book marketing. I have often been amazed when in conversation with him at how his mind works, and all of the valuable insights and resources he has at his disposal.

I had the pleasure of meeting Brian in a social setting a couple of years ago, where we enjoyed talking about books, writing and the publishing industry in general. At that time, he was still very active in an organization that he’d started, the Connecticut Authors and Publishers Association. As a newbie in the midst of writing my first book, I aspired to be at that level someday and Brian was gracious with his knowledge and advice.

That’s no less true today. Brian regularly speaks at writers’ conferences and other industry events, as well as providing consulting services, and focusing his efforts on more lucrative and “out of the box” sales activities related to book marketing and promotion. [Read more…]

How to Get More Endorsements on LinkedIn

There are many things you can do to optimize your LinkedIn profile, and an optimized profile means more profile views, right? After all, you’ll be showing up in search results more frequently…

The only problem is, people can endorse you for skills you don’t actually have… Thus skewing how you turn up in search results.

So, should you avoid adding skills to your profile? No!

But you must be wiling to manage things a bit. Just because someone endorses you for a new skill doesn’t mean you have to accept that endorsement.

I typically recommend that you start by choosing 50 skills that you possess. This way, you’re in charge of what skills people are likely to endorse you for.

The next step then is to ask other people to confirm that you possess those talents. LinkedIn also helps the process by periodically asking your connections if they can endorse a particular skill for you.

You’d think this could pretty much run on auto-pilot then, right?

Well… Not really… Depending on how well your connections know you, sometimes the endorsements can start being a bit skewed. [Read more…]

LinkedIn Announces Their Latest Profile Changes

Last week, LinkedIn announced the new LinkedIn Premium Experience, with new ways to make your profile stand out visually, suggestions to help you optimize your profile, the ability to stand out more in search results (think of Google’s AuthorRank here), opening the privacy settings on your profile to allow more people to find and engage with you, and better tracking ability to understand your impact and visibility.

[Note: The majority of these features are only available to paying LinkedIn customers at this time, but some will make their way into the free accounts over time as well.]

Enhance Your Profile Visually

Taking its cue from other social networks, LinkedIn now allows premium members to add a cover image to their profile. This can be a great way to extend your brand or give viewers a visual clue as to who you are and what you are like.

You’ll have access to:

  • Larger profile photos
  • Expanded backgrounds

Artfully combining the two can convey a rich story. For example, Richard Branson’s cover image is of clouds, with his profile picture looking upward, denoting his reputation for progressive ideas that push the normal boundaries of business (and that he owns an airline that’s reaching for the stars).

Richard Branson - Founder of Virgin

 

In a few months, all members will be able to add the custom profile background, which is great, if you find an artful way to use it! [Read more…]