The BookBub Experience

Geraldine Evans Today’s guest post is by Geraldine Evans, a British writer of police procedurals that contain a lot of humour and family drama. She and I met in LinkedIn’s Book Marketing group when she shared her experience using BookBub, a site that alerts interested readers to limited-time free and discounted ebooks matching their interests.

I’ve used BookBub to find new reading material for a couple of years now, but had wondered how it works out from the author’s perspective. When Geraldine shared such a comprehensive review of her experience, I asked her if she’d be willing to do the same thing here for you.

I know there are a lot of numbers involved and that sometimes you’d prefer to avoid those, but they’re worth delving into. So, sit back and enjoy! I promise you, it will get those creative juices flowing.

Are you considering paying for an ad for your book with BookBub? What are you waiting for? Go for it! You’re likely to find it’s worth every penny. Yes, it’s expensive; it was the cost that held me back. Well, that, and the comments on kboards.com/Writers’ Café. According to many members on that forum, getting your book accepted by BookBub was about as likely as flying off on Richard Branson’s spaceship.

But my book was accepted on my very first application. No, I’m not a well-known name. No, I don’t have hundreds of reviews from a dedicated coterie of readers. And I’m definitely not sleeping with the management! And the book for which I wanted the ad is in the mystery/thriller genre, one of their most popular categories. So I had lots of competition.

But, what I think may have worked in my favour is that I was willing to be flexible on my choice of date for the ad. Perhaps, too, the fact that I write mainly in series was also a no-brainer for them. Maybe they assumed I’d be only too willing to pay for further ads for each of the other books in my 15-strong Rafferty & Llewellyn series. They wouldn’t be wrong about that as my experience with them was very positive. [Read more…]

3 Rules for Marketing Yourself Through Podcasts

If you’re an author or a speaker, marketing may not be a natural fit for your creative personality, but that doesn’t change one simple fact. Connecting with the masses is the key to building and maintaining an audience. Your creativity is why they want to hear what you have to say. Podcasting is an exciting and effective way to stand out and literally let your voice be heard.

Start first, as always with marketing, by knowing who it is that you want to reach. Then start researching the podcasts that your desired audience listens to.

3 Rules for Marketing Through Podcasts - Aleweb Social Marketing

Podcasting is a perfect way to market to the masses.

1. Aim High

Shoot to become a guest on the best podcasts you know. Pick the ones that you enjoy as well as those that enjoy success. If you settle for the shows that you’re sure you can get on, you’re settling for not just a smaller audience, but for reduced credibility. Just a single appearance on a large, credible podcast can boost sales and readership, and it is possible to get a great guest spot on a popular show.

Amy Harrop discusses marketing your book through podcasting, and one of her best conclusions is that it’s better to do one major spot than a whole bunch of less consequential shows. [Read more…]

Getting Your Story Out There

Today’s guest post is from Jical Jial of Mosotomoss. He is a Creative Stager that helps entrepreneurs to stage their story. You can see more of his writing at Mosotomossblog.com.

Create the story you want pepol to seeCreate the story you want people to see and take ownership of what you want them to hear. It’s never too late to get your story out there. I know sometimes it can feel like a daunting task to do everything yourself. There are many steps you have to take to get your story out, but if you break those steps up, it doesn’t seem so daunting.

As a writer, you may think writing your book was the hard part. But I would say, marketing the book is the hard part. When you don’t have a team of creative people behind you coming up with ideas to market the book, it can be frustrating. Don’t wait until the book is finished to start working on the marketing. I’ve seen way too many authors finish a book and then ask, “what’s next?”

To market your story is to seduce your audience into wanting more of what you have to offer. Just like you build the suspense up in your book, you have to do the same thing with your marketing. You have to create anticipation in your audience. Writing a blog post or creating lively chats on Facebook are two great ways for you to build up the suspense.

Create rich dialog about certain situations in the book without giving away any of the book. Make what you’re posting relevant to your audience. All characters must go through something, and so does your audience. Now would be a great time to pull them in, not after you have written the book and when it’s about to be published.

Today’s publishers want to know how big your audience is. That often determines if you will be able to secure a traditional publishing contract. Without an audience, it’s hard to sell the book. Having an audience to sell to says a lot about you. It says you are interesting, and people want to hear what you have to say.

I am often asked whether an author should post excerpts of a new book on a blog. I would never recommend doing that. It’s always best to blog about characters or storylines without giving away anything. It’s really important as an author for you to be engaged with your audience. So find ways to start conversations about the book, rather than giving previews of it.

When it comes to your marketing plan, don’t just think about selling the book. Most authors never think about merchandising, for example, selling T-shirts with quotes on them that your character says, like “Who is John Galt?”  Promoting your merchandise is a great way for you to not only make extra money, but build a brand empire up at the same time as building your audience. 

You are an entrepreneur, believe it or not. Telling yourself you are just a writer won’t work. When you believe you are an entrepreneur, you act like an entrepreneur. There are many more ways of getting your story out there. The main way is to build the story up before it ever really gets finished or heads to the publisher. Generate a buzz about your book as early as possible. The more people you know, the more chances you have in selling them something they want to have.

A Beginners Guide to Self-promotion

Are you a first-time, self-published author? Wondering where to get started with promoting your new book? Or, perhaps you’ve traditionally published your book and are surprised by how little your publisher will be doing to market your book?

self-promotion, marketing, publishing, book, author, social media, publicity

Don’t wait until the last minute to begin marketing.

 

A Beginners Guide to Self-promotion

The biggest mistake that many authors make is waiting until the last minute to think about how they are going to market a book. Oftentimes, it’s not until after it is already published that they even start to consider “what’s next?” However, marketing plans should be started early in the writing process so that you have sufficient time to build the connections, relationships and social media profiles necessary to get the word out about your new title.

If you’re like the vast majority of writers, a marketing plan may never have even made it onto your To Do list. Here you are, with your newly published book in hand, and no idea what to do next.

Your marketing strategy is going to be different than someone who started earlier, unless you have a large platform already (a platform is the online reach you have using e-mail, social profiles and other online connections to connect with an audience.). Building an audience takes time, especially if social marketing is going to be a part of your overall marketing strategy. The goal of any good marketing strategy though is going to include maximizing exposure to the right target audience for your book. And while self-promotion may feel awkward and uncomfortable to you, there is no one who knows your material better than you do! You can do this! [Read more…]