Facebook Author Parties/Events and Why We Do Them

Over the summer, I participated in a Facebook event unlike any I had ever been to before. It was an online Women’s Fiction Summer Party. A collection of women’s fiction authors banded together to hold a Facebook event that lasted several hours (5!). By cross-promoting the event, these authors were helping each other to increase their fanbase and mailing lists.

This same group of authors is hosting their next event, a Facebook Author Holiday Party on November 7, 2017. So, if you want to see this phenomenon in action, check it out!

The idea seemed ingenious to me and was one I wanted to learn more about, so I contacted one of the participating authors, Patricia Sands, to see if she’d be willing to fill me in on the process behind the event a bit more. After spending a lovely hour talking with her, I knew I wanted to share this information with you as well, so I asked her to write today’s guest blog post.

So, without further ado, here’s Patricia’s feedback on how to hold a successful Author Party on Facebook for your fans.


The key ingredient to success is organization.

After being a novelist for eight years, I have learned many lessons about interactions on Facebook with readers. The bottom line is that writers and readers all benefit from opportunities to connect with each other. Make them fun!

Facebook author events are always chaotic with many conversation threads going at the same time. It is essential to refresh your page regularly to keep up with the chat. Some people actually follow along on a second device, such as an iPad, phone, or another computer. I have not mastered that technique yet!

The Setup

There are Author Assistants (AA) who offer services to manage such an event. In my opinion, this assistance and experience are crucial to the success of the party. What our AA offers us is priceless. She helps put together graphics and makes suggestions with regard to the theme.

To participate in the event, each author commits to be present at a specific time and to provide at least one giveaway as a raffle prize for the readers.

Once all the authors are on board, the AA sets up a Google document or Excel spreadsheet. Each author enters their information into the spreadsheet, including desired time slot, name, giveaways, questions they want asked, website, Rafflecopter links, etc.

Facebook Author Event promo exampleWe typically have a theme for each Facebook author event (usually seasonal, for example, Summer Party) so our AA can prepare promotional graphics for us.

Each author shares about the event through all their social media platforms. We may even send a “save the date” message out first.

Our event is also cross-promoted as a Goodreads event. However, we hold off on serious promotions until a week before the event. At that time, each author invites all their “friends” on Facebook and Goodreads.

The Event

During the event, each author has a half-hour time slot (or whatever works based on the length of the party and number of authors) to be featured to the attendees. (Scheduling consideration is given for different time zones.)

The AA introduces each author at the appropriate time, including posting an author photo and book covers as well as other basic information about:

  • the author
  • the book being promoted at the party
  • their giveaway.

Ebooks and paperbacks are the standard prizes for giveaways. However, everyone makes an effort to add more creative prizes, from something as simple as Amazon gift cards or book bags to coffee mugs and candles.

At our last party, since my book was set in France, the biggest prize I gave away was a box of macarons (cookies) from France. It was a big hit.

For each giveaway, a question is posted by the author, always accompanied by a photo of something relating to the topic. The more fun you can make it, the better.

The AA monitors everything, keeping track of participants and winners. She comes in at the appointed times to introduce the next author and keeps everything to the established timeline.

The AA also sets up a Rafflecopter raffle, which fans must enter to be eligible for the BIG prize (established by the authors) and tasks must be completed to enter (such as subscribe to newsletter, “like” certain social media pages, “follow” on pages, etc.) Often the authors will all kick in an agreed amount for the “big” prize…say ten authors will each contribute $10 to offer a $100 gift card. Or $20 each and have a few smaller gift cards as well.

The After-Party

At the end of the event, the AA sends an email to the authors with contact information for the winners and a separate document with all of the new names.

Authors also go back into the event once it’s over and “like” any new person who attended.

Our experience with these events has been positive. We try to maintain meaningful topics for our questions that allow readers to tell us something about themselves, rather than us doing the talking. Each author attempts to respond to every comment posted on their threads…although this is not always possible when there is a high attendance.

The key thing is to make it fun, sincere and interesting…with good giveaways.

Patricia Sands, authorBestselling author Patricia Sands lives in Toronto, Canada, when she isn’t somewhere else, and calls the south of France her second home. I Promise You This, Book 3 in her award-winning Love in Provence trilogy, was published May 17, 2016. Her next novel, Drawing Lessons, was released by Lake Union Publishing on October 1, 2017.

Find out more at Patricia’s Facebook Author PageAmazon Author Page or her website. There are links to her books, social media, and a monthly newsletter that has special giveaways, photography from France, and sneak peeks at her next book. She loves hearing from readers.

Patricia is represented by Pamela Harty of The Knight Agency.

Podcasting Has Improved My Life

Today’s guest post is from Michele the Trainer, who is a Mobile Concierge Celebrity Personal Trainer, motivational and educational speaker, healthy lifestyle weight loss coach, and published author with a health and fitness system based on her 3 M’s: Motivation, Movement and Mindset.

Have you ever wanted to do something that looked dauntingly complex and you weren’t sure where to start, or if it was possible to figure it all out?

Moons ago, I bought a podcasting kit with high hopes, opened it up, and it looked so complicated. It was a big box that included unfamiliar wires that were round. It also contained a mixer with some giant headphones and a large microphone.

I would have needed a separate desk or more office space for it. So I closed that box up straight away and shelved it for years.

Soon after I ordered my podcasting kit, it seemed like podcasts suddenly were no longer “the thing.” Fast-forward to five years later they came back, big, and I decided to revisit the idea and see if any of the technology had become any easier. So I asked around.

I’m a terse emailer. I asked a friend a question about podcasting and I received an even shorter reply that was only 3 words, “Evaer and Audacity.”

That email was from my pal Dave Bullis, who produces the Dave Bullis Podcast. (He was just featured this year by Podbean after his 100th episode.)

Anyway, I’m fairly technical, so instead of asking a zillion questions, I installed both of the softwares (PC-based) that Dave mentioned, learned enough of them to be dangerous and I bought that reasonable USB microphone for PC from Amazon based on reviews.

That was the birth of the Michele the Trainer Show and Dave Bullis was my first guest. He taught me more about Evaer, the software I use to record my Skype audio calls, during the Michele the Trainer Show episode 1.

Michele the Trainer Show podcast Ep01 - Dave Bullis

Judy Reagan from Listeners Digest Podcast also chimed in to help me understand a bit about audio editing. She uses a MAC, and I use a PC, so we recorded episode 4 of the Michele the Trainer show about audio editing:

Michele the Trainer Show podcast Ep04 - Judy Reagan

All three of us are technical, which helped the learning curve, but once putting a show together is understood, the rest is really administrative and promotional.

International Women in Film podcastI am no means an audio engineer, but the Michele the Trainer Show podcast has been rolling for awhile. In 2016, I launched the International Women in Film podcast and host it as well.

Because the only equipment I need is the USB mic and some headphones, I can record from anywhere on the planet with my laptop.

My show, the Michele the Trainer Show, is more of a channel because I’m a polymath and didn’t really want to niche. I wanted to try different types of shows within one show and see what would rise above organically.

For example, some of my shows are Interesting Interviews, some are Tool Talk and some are Liquid Hike type shows (named to match my environmentalist nature blog, these shows are about conservation or green tech).

Of course, listing on iTunes requires some category definition.

Like any good ritual we start (exercising, writing, idea listing, etc.), posting podcasts on a regular basis takes discipline.

But that is how I met Tara Alemany, owner of Aleweb Social Marketing! I was looking for new smart guests that had something to teach my audience and we connected. These connections are the best part of podcasting. We take time out of our swamped schedule to create something together that can benefit both of our audiences.

There is a lot of content out there to choose from, so always be respectful of your listener’s time. Plan your episodes and make sure that if someone is commuting they will learn something while listening. 

If you’re looking for a way to really network online and you’re a giver of value, podcasting is a great project. It’s the way networking should be, giver’s gain, and I’ve made a lot of friends since the Michele the Trainer Show launched.

(For more on matchers and givers, I recommend reading the book Give and Take by Adam M. Grant.)

Like blogging, the content is out there and listeners can continue to listen to it as long as it’s available online. So it’s a great way to get your message across and to build your brand.

The Benefits of Podcasting

Here are just a few of the benefits that I have found of podcasting:

  1. Networking: Meeting new people and working together on something. It might be only an hour on the phone together to prep for and record a show, but often we stay in touch and continue to network online.
  2. Giving Value: Reaching out to an audience and bringing value. Providing content on demand!
  3. Hobnobbing with other podcasters: Becoming part of the larger “giver’s gain” podcasting community.
  4. Interesting technology: Learning the audio engineering technology.
  5. Having a platform: Offering other people a virtual ‘stage and microphone.’
  6. Having a voice: For the first time in history there is no gatekeeper. If you want to save the world, now is the time to get your message out there!
  7. Follow the fun: It’s just plain fun to see your own content on iTunes along with Aerosmith and other rock stars. It’s fun to hear your voice on the radios and smartphones of others!
  8. Reach audio learners: Some folks learn more from hearing than they do from visuals or reading, and now you can reach those people.
  9. Learning: I learn so much from everyone I interact with, especially my guests!
  10. Living the DJ dream: It’s just cool to have a show on the internet, just like AM radio DJs were cool back in the day.
  11. Interacting with listeners: This is one of the best parts of podcasting!

Now I’m able to help everyone have a voice.

If you want to start a show, let me know. I’d be happy to help!

Four Ways to Get Stellar Results When You’re Working With a Copywriter

Today’s guest post is from Debra Jason, a copywriter, speaker, author and multi-faceted marketing mentor who I have had the pleasure of connecting with online. Her specialty is in helping people develop the content needed for websites and direct marketing materials that successfully positions the brand for maximum results.

I know many of you are great communicators, but struggle when it comes time to “sell yourself.” You may become tongue-tied and have no idea what to say. Working with a copywriter takes the pressure off and allows you to focus on what you do best. Debra’s post shares with us how to get stellar results when you do.

If you’re an author, speaker or entrepreneur getting ready to launch a website or marketing campaign, but unsure about writing promotional content, you may turn to an independent writer to assist you.

Working on any promotional literature, be it a website, brochure or an extensive direct mail package, is a team effort between you, your copywriter and graphic designer. It’s a partnership created to develop the best tools for promoting your product/service. Each person in the partnership has certain responsibilities.

Debra Jason, author of Millionaire Marketing on a Shoestring Budget

The purpose of this post is to help you be aware of your role – obtaining and organizing the valuable information a copywriter needs from you.

Being organized and prepared before you meet with the writer for an input meeting will save you time and money in the long run. And, it increases your chances of getting the results you’re looking for – record-breaking ones – as soon as the first draft.

4 Tips for Working with a Copywriter

The following four steps will help you gather the appropriate information you need to pass along to your writer:

1. Define your goals — convey them clearly.

What is it that you want to achieve with the project you’re going to assign to your copywriter? Do you want to sell more product, gain name recognition/brand awareness, create an image or generate new leads?

Remember, if your objectives are too complex then you risk confusing your copywriter. Simply state your goals. It sets your copywriter off in the right direction — to create an effective, results-oriented promotion for you.

As an independent copywriter, I take the time to listen to you. Tell me what it is you need to say. I’ll tell you how to say it. I make sure that I clearly understand your goals, translating them into fresh ideas that sell your product/service.

2. Don’t be shy — tell her everything.

You know your product/service best. A copywriter knows how to write to promote that product. So, don’t be shy. Tell her everything about it. If your copywriter asks you a lot of questions, be grateful. The more you can tell her, the better your chances are of getting what you want — as soon as the first draft.

What is the single strongest benefit of your product/service (i.e., the benefit that harnesses the greatest selling power)? List all of the additional benefits. Why should someone buy your product over the competition? What makes yours special?

Your writer’s goal is to create a piece that converts prospects into loyal, raving fans. If you have printed materials in the past (i.e., marketing plan, brochures, testimonials, etc.), provide those to your writer as well.

3. Know your audience — introduce her to them.

It is important for you to know who you’re speaking to. Tell your copywriter about your audience. Better yet, imagine you’re introducing her to one person from that target market. Then, tell her what you know about that individual.

First, what keeps your ideal clients up at night? What are the challenges/issues they’re facing on a daily basis? How does your product/service solve their problems and make their lives easier?

What are the demographics of your audience? And, what do you know about their lifestyles (i.e., psychographics) such as what kind of cars do they drive, do they dine out or eat at home? Do they use credit cards or pay with cash? Is your product/service familiar to your audience (how aware are they that you/your product exists)?

Do your best to answer questions such as those mentioned above and tell your copywriter what you discover. Keep in mind that the tone of a brochure or website will differ if you want to reach single professional women, 25-35 years old vs. married women in their 50s.

Don’t hesitate to introduce your audience to your writer. The more you can tell her, the easier it is for her to “get acquainted” with them before she starts to write. The resulting piece us one that attracts prospects’ attention, makes an impact and motivates them to buy your product or service.

4. Hire a copywriter who is not only talented — she’s reliable & trustworthy.

The project you’re about to assign — be it a brochure, website, direct mail package — sends a message out to the world about your product/service. You want to make a good first impression.

Your copywriter should also make a good first impression — with you. Of course, you want her to be talented. But that’s not enough to get your project done. Have you established a positive personal rapport? You should both feel comfortable sharing opinions and making compromises to achieve your goals.

Working with my clients is a team effort — a partnership created to develop the best marketing tools for your product. Talented copywriters take pride in the fact that these relationships include mutual trust and respect. Remember these four steps the next time you’re looking for great results from your copywriter.

Have any other tips you’d like to suggest? Please share them in the comment section below because I’d love to hear from you. Thanks a million and here’s to your sweet success.

 

About Debra Jason: Marketing and writing with heart, not hype, Debra encourages you to communicate your marketing message in a way that captivates and converts your prospects into loyal, raving fans – even if you have been struggling with how to transform your ideas into words in the past. Visit her at WriteDirection.com.

Speaker and author of the award-winning book Millionaire Marketing on a Shoestring Budget™, she not only inspires and educates, she empowers creative solopreneurs with relationship-building strategies that help them create a lifestyle business that provides them with the flexibility, fun and freedom to do what they love. Seeking a dynamic speaker for your next event, contact Debra at DebraJason.com.

A Tale of Two Book Launches: How I Bungled My Second Book Launch after a Blockbuster First One

Today’s guest post is a follow-up article from our friend, Victor Prince, a consultant and speaker who teaches strategy and leadership skills to clients around the world, sharing the very different experience he had when launching his second book from his first.

I published my first book last summer. The launch went better than I dreamed, entirely due to the help of my publisher, my co-author, and wonderful websites like this one that were willing to help. (Thanks again for your kindness in letting me submit a guest blog, Tara.)

Victor Prince headshot

Victor Prince, author of
Executive Farm: A Leadership Fable

I was recently inspired to write a leadership fable as a short story. I self-published it as a 22-page novella on Amazon. It’s about a team of corporate executives who think they are headed to a golf resort for their annual retreat but are going to work a dairy farm instead as a team building exercise. It was my first stab at both fiction and self-publishing. I was excited and confident.

Then I self-published it and realized how different that experience was versus working with a publisher and co-author. I did my homework, so I didn’t make obvious mistakes, like not hiring an editor to review my manuscript.

I was very happy with my book content. I was not happy with what happened with my launch.

Here are the 5 mistakes (or misfortunes) I made in my first attempt at launching a self-published book.

  1. Publishing on LinkedIn – I published my original story as a five-part series over a week’s worth of posts on LinkedIn. I’ve had a lot of luck publishing blogs and building a reader base on LinkedIn, so it was a comfortable choice. I knew it was a non-traditional format for that channel, but I thought that it might give the book more chance of going viral, with each day being an opportunity to catch readers’ attention for all the other days. Unfortunately, the story got little traction after I published it. Worse, because I had published it, I could no longer submit it to other channels as original content.
  2. Timing – After I did research on the self-publishing route and cleared it with my literary agent, I decided to go with Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) program. I got caught up in formatting and reformatting different versions of the PDF as I loaded it into the system. I was excited when I finally got it exactly as I wanted and I hit the button. I didn’t realize that as soon as I did that I also put it on sale on Amazon. Unlike my first book, I didn’t give myself an advance release date to do guest blogging and other things to promote the book’s launch. I suppose I could have taken it down and started over, but I just left it up and decided to do a crash course promotion over the next days. I mapped out a plan and decided to make the best of it. Wednesday, April 20th, wasn’t the publication day I would have picked on purpose, but it was the day I had.
  3. Tragically Bad Luck – I have several websites that are important parts of the platform I use to promote my work. Ever since I built those, I’d gotten a small but steady flow of traffic of people looking, not for information about me, but for a celebrity with whom I share a name. It took me a while to figure out the inbound traffic to my sites from searches for “the sacrifice of victor prince” wasn’t from people seeking to do me harm, but from people looking for a specific song by a great artist. I was about to start promoting my web page with links to the book on my social networks when I heard the tragic news of Prince’s death on the radio. After I got past the shock, I realized that my book launch plans were also a tiny collateral victim of that tragic loss. What had been a constant trickle of traffic to my site looking for information about Prince became a tidal wave. Because I didn’t want to look like I was trying to benefit from the tragedy, I canceled my plans to promote my book via my websites.
  4. The Chicken vs. Egg Limbo – I was inspired to write the book as an homage to my uncles who let me spend my summers as a kid “helping” them on their dairy farms. I wanted the book to have success and good reviews before I presented it to them. But without a launch, I had few initial readers. And with few initial readers, I didn’t want to present them a book that looked like a dud. More importantly, since the book’s characters were inspired by them, I didn’t want them to think it was a statement about them. I was in limbo.
  5. Printed Copies – If my uncles downloaded the ebook on Amazon, they would see the lack of reviews. I figured out an alternative plan – I would get some printed copies that I could send to them. I chose the on-demand printed publishing format Amazon has and was excited until I found out that my book was 3 pages below the minimum to produce printed copies. So much for Plan B.

I have yet to figure out the best path forward from this bungled book launch. Three random readers that have found the book have taken the initiative to email me with great feedback, so I am confident in the story. I am just sad about my failure to launch it.  I’m sure many stories better than mine have died quiet deaths, and I fear this one might as well.

 

 

About the Author: Victor Prince is a consultant and speaker who teaches strategy and leadership skills to clients around the world. Victor’s book, Lead Inside the Box: How Smart Leaders Guide their Teams to Exceptional Results, has been named a Top 20 semi-finalist for 2016 Leadership Book of the Year. See Victor’s other posts on his LinkedIn blog, such as “Lessons Dairy Farming Gave me before my MBA” and “5 Project Management Lessons From my Camino Across Spain.” Victor’s latest book, Executive Farm: A Leadership Fable, is available on Amazon.

 

Doc Swiner is Your Favorite Social Media Family Doc

Today’s guest post is from C. Nicole Swiner, MD, whom I recently met through a Facebook group we both belong to. She is a family medicine/general medicine expert (look for #docswiner), covering a broad spectrum of both medical and mental health issues, as well as an author and speaker.

Your Favorite Social Media Family Doc…

…that’s what I like to call myself.

C. Nicole Swiner, MD

C. Nicole Swiner, MD

When I first started practicing Family Medicine, I didn’t even know what Facebook was. I avoided it like the plague, wondering why anyone would want to share their private moments and pictures with strangers on the Internet. But as I began to write articles and started to blog, my husband (who I think is a Marketing genius) encouraged me to consider it more. I was new in my practice, getting ready to start a private practice, and decided to soon write a book, so it made sense. I needed to be on social media. Most importantly, it was free.

I was new in my practice, soon to be starting a private practice, and decided to write a book as well, so it made sense. I needed to be on social media. Most importantly, it was free.

After a while, I became a pro (or addicted, some might say!) and I was on all of the popular social media outlets. I later developed a separate business page just for my medical blogs and, from those, my book How to Avoid the Superwoman Complex was born.

Not many of my colleagues had written a book and most didn’t use social media at the time. For me, it has been a necessary and effective tool for building visibility my book and brand.

I owe the success (and funding, for that matter) of my book to Facebook and social media.

By using GoFundMe.com, I was able to raise money for publishing my book and start taking pre-orders, while the word spread like wildfire. Within a month or two, I’d raised money and pre-sold a large number of books. Thereafter, whenever I sold a copy or spoke to someone about the book, I asked him or her to post a selfie with it and tag me in it. Every time, at least one of their friends asked about the book and bought it. That’s a win-win.

I’ve also become a fan of repurposing one thing and using it in multiple ways on social media to be efficient. For example, I still write my blog, so this is how I repurpose it:

  • I do a live biweekly broadcast on Periscope on a given topic.
  • I have someone transcribe what I’ve said and post it as a blog.
  • I share the blog post on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and LinkedIn.
  • Then I share the article with Facebook groups I belong to, who may use it to post to their collective networks or in a magazine.
  • Soon I’m going to start doing webinars, based on the blog post, and add a Powerpoint presentation to it.

When speaking in the community, I draw topics from the conversations there to discuss with my online following. Why re-invent the wheel?

So, as you can see, I couldn’t do business without social media. It’s another way for me to practice medicine in this tech-savvy world and to reach people I’d otherwise never meet. It’s a must for entrepreneurs of all types now. You’re behind the times if you’re not online.

How to Market Your Book Yourself the Right Way

Today’s guest post is from Jennifer Landry, a dedicated web journalist living in Malibu, California. Jennifer specializes in writing articles about business, marketing and the social media landscape. You can follow her on Twitter at @jkalandry.

Start Marketing First

Jennifer Landry headshot

Jennifer Landry

This may sound counter-intuitive, but hang with me for a minute, and this will make sense. Start connecting with your potential readers long before you plan on asking them to purchase a book from you. Building your network, or as Seth Godin terms it, “your tribe” takes time.

There is only one sure way to build a tribe: consistently deliver value of some kind over and over so that people know they can trust you to deliver value over and over.

For writers, this means writing things that do one or both of two things–entertain and inform. Typically non-fiction writers work more on the “inform” end of the spectrum and fiction writers operate more on the “entertain” end. But there is no rule that says you can’t do both. The fact is, one of the reasons writing is so hard is that there aren’t really but a few rules, and they are more like general guidelines. Unfortunately, the same goes for marketing. [Read more…]

Congratulations, You Won a Book Award! Now What?

Today’s post is a guest post from James Ventrillo, who is the president of Readers’ Favorite, which runs one of the most popular book award contests online.

While researching contests to submit my latest book to (The Best is Yet to Come), I came across a post from James on BookBaby that impressed me called “6 Things Authors Should Know About Book Award Contests.”

I reached out to him to ask if he’d be willing to share some thoughts with you about how to gain the most visibility from having an award-winning book. After all, I hope to be able to make that claim later this year, along with every other entry hopeful that applies to a book award contest.

For those who are interested, the annual Readers’ Favorite book award contest is accepting entries until June 1st. Additionally, the site offers free reviews for authors. So, it’s a great resource to check out! Click here to learn more.

Readers Favorite Book AwardsPlacing in a book award contest is no easy feat and can dramatically change the way people see you and your work, as it should. If you did not quite reach an award level, but still received an honorable mention or were a finalist, you can still get a ton of mileage from it. So here are 5 tips to help you get the most out of your new award.

What’s in a name?

As an award-winner you can and should refer to yourself as an award-winning author! You should also refer to your book as an award-winning book. From now on those two words should append any mention of you and your work, from your email signature to your book’s cover. If you have a profile somewhere, update it. Wherever you are selling your book, update it. If your name or book title is out there somewhere, go slap on your new moniker and award image, you earned it! [Read more…]

The BookBub Experience

Geraldine Evans Today’s guest post is by Geraldine Evans, a British writer of police procedurals that contain a lot of humour and family drama. She and I met in LinkedIn’s Book Marketing group when she shared her experience using BookBub, a site that alerts interested readers to limited-time free and discounted ebooks matching their interests.

I’ve used BookBub to find new reading material for a couple of years now, but had wondered how it works out from the author’s perspective. When Geraldine shared such a comprehensive review of her experience, I asked her if she’d be willing to do the same thing here for you.

I know there are a lot of numbers involved and that sometimes you’d prefer to avoid those, but they’re worth delving into. So, sit back and enjoy! I promise you, it will get those creative juices flowing.

Are you considering paying for an ad for your book with BookBub? What are you waiting for? Go for it! You’re likely to find it’s worth every penny. Yes, it’s expensive; it was the cost that held me back. Well, that, and the comments on kboards.com/Writers’ Café. According to many members on that forum, getting your book accepted by BookBub was about as likely as flying off on Richard Branson’s spaceship.

But my book was accepted on my very first application. No, I’m not a well-known name. No, I don’t have hundreds of reviews from a dedicated coterie of readers. And I’m definitely not sleeping with the management! And the book for which I wanted the ad is in the mystery/thriller genre, one of their most popular categories. So I had lots of competition.

But, what I think may have worked in my favour is that I was willing to be flexible on my choice of date for the ad. Perhaps, too, the fact that I write mainly in series was also a no-brainer for them. Maybe they assumed I’d be only too willing to pay for further ads for each of the other books in my 15-strong Rafferty & Llewellyn series. They wouldn’t be wrong about that as my experience with them was very positive. [Read more…]

5 Good Reasons Why You Need the Expertise of Professional Website Designers

Today’s guest post is from Tiffany Olson, who works at Optimize Worldwide in California, a small web development company that specializes in search engine friendly web design. Some of her hobbies include doing yoga, cooking, and reading.

Computer with Website Designed by Aleweb Social MarketingIn this day and age, marketing your next book or your next big talk requires a functioning website to serve as the face of your project on the Internet. However, a site that isn’t effective at making a positive first impression on its visitors doesn’t add any value and can actually end up undermining it.

Many people believe that creating a website is simple and they can save a few dollars by making it a DIY project, but more often than not, this doesn’t produce the lucrative results they desire. A well-built site can help to make projects and business ventures very profitable, and to achieve this, it usually takes the experience and know-how of professional website designers. [Read more…]

Incorporating Holiday Events into Your Social Media Campaign

Today’s guest post is from Craig Robinson, an online writer for Qwaya, a facebook ad campaign tool. He loves to write different topics about social media tips and strategies. Besides writing, he also enjoys engaging with different communities and social forums. Be sure to follow him on twitter @Craig_Qwaya.

 

Aleweb Social Marketing - Social Media Christmas TreeThe mass expansion of social media has opened a lot of doors to individuals looking to make an impact with their brand through public speaking.

Whether you refer to it as the speaker community, the lecture circuit, or any other name, this is an old-school method of reaching an audience that dates back to Rome, with would-be Senators speaking to crowds in alleys about issues.

Today, of course, public speaking is incredibly modern and interactive.

Even though sites like Facebook and YouTube make it possible for public speakers to reach a much larger audience, it can still be quite difficult to attract a lot of people to an event.

The larger overall audience is a huge plus for any speaker. Though, for many authors and other solo speakers, a large live audience is what ultimately pays the bills. Below, we will look at a few different ways to turn that online following into an increase in live attendance for a holiday event. [Read more…]