How to Keep Track of Booking Speaking Gigs

In a discussion group for speakers, someone recently asked the question:

What has helped you the MOST at booking speaking gigs?

Now, you may be reading this post as an author thinking to yourself I don’t have to book speaking gigs! but every author appearance you make, whether it’s at a conference, in a bookstore, with a book discussion group, etc. is, in its own way, a speaking gig whether you’re getting paid to do it or not.

It took me a while to ease into a system of booking speaking gigs that worked for me and was repeatable with my clients.

Here’s the response that I gave to the question.

This may sound like a silly response, but I mean it in all seriousness… I come across all sorts of opportunities, and for a long time, I pursued them by the seat of my pants.

When I stepped back, set up a CRM, added all the conferences I was interested in (including their dates and locations), reached out to organizers to find out when submissions opened, noted that info in the CRM, set tasks in the CRM to remind me to make contact, created templates for the gist of what I wanted to say (that would, of course, be customized to the individual I was sending it to), etc. Things really became much easier.

Every month, I could go into the CRM, see who I needed to reach out to, etc. I knew what my process was for approaching conferences I wanted to speak at, and I followed it. Having a tool and a process made all the difference in the world AND allowed me to delegate the outreach when I was so inclined.

So, what’s a CRM you might ask?

A CRM is a Customer Relationship Manager system.

There are plenty of them out there. Some are online. Some are software you use on your computer. There are apps as well.

Zoho CRMSome are free. Others are premium.

They all offer different features, so it’s important to figure out exactly what you want the system to do for you.

Personally, I use Zoho CRM.

It’s free for up to 10 users on your account. You can customize it to collect your leads the way you want, and it integrates nicely with other applications.

I can define templates for reaching out to my “leads” (in this case, event organizers, association contacts, bookstore owners, discussion group leaders, podcast hosts, etc.).

So, once the CRM is configured the way I want it, here’s what I do.

For each conference I’m interested in pursuing, I create a “lead.” Here’s what my customized blank lead page looks like.

Create a lead in Zoho CRM

I capture as much information as I can about the conference. When I first start, it may be minimal information. For example, for the example below, I couldn’t readily find an email address, but I did locate the phone number. So I recorded that.

As long as I have some kind of contact information (or a form), it’s a good start for a lead.

Create a lead in Zoho CRM

I always use the Description field to capture something from the conference description, whether it’s a mission statement, promo copy, etc. That way I have a quick reminder as to the focus of the conference and what it considers important.

The saved record also has other information I can capture further down the page. So, if you scroll down you see this.

Create a lead in Zoho CRM - lower half

My next step is to add any notes I want to make regarding what I’ve found out about the conference, and what I think might be a good offer for the event planner. This saves me having to try to remember what I’d planned to do with this particular conference later on.

After that, I create a new task.

For this particular conference, I found it too late to bother the event organizer for this year’s conference. It’s later this week!

As a courtesy, I don’t want to contact them next week either. They need a chance to recover from all that’s gone into this year’s conference first.

But I can guarantee you, within the next two months, they’ll already be starting to think next year’s conference if this is an annual event. So, that’s an ideal time for me to reach out and ask about next year’s submission guidelines.

Therefore, I set a task for myself to follow up on this lead.

Create a task in Zoho CRM

At that time, I’ll come back into this record and send an email, using one of my pre-defined templates, to request information on their conference submission guidelines. Since the message is already written, I only have to customize minor portions of it to make it applicable to this particular conference. So, the outreach only takes a few minutes.

I’ll update this lead record with new information as I get it, so that it becomes as comprehensive and robust as possible, making future outreach that much easier.

When I find out the submission requirements for the event, I’ll set another task for myself, with the appropriate due date, and come back here to send another templated email that contains my proposed talk topic and a link to my speakers one-sheet and audio samples. I’ll also include one or two endorsements from other event planners I’ve worked with recently.

Using a CRM in this way allows me to create a repeatable process that I can hand off to a virtual assistant or tackle quickly one at a time as time allows. Each month, I can go in, look at the outreach I’d planned to do that month, and do it quickly right from within the system.

When it comes to sending emails to my contacts for speaking engagements, I prefer to do it directly from Zoho so that the outreach is recorded there. However, any responses I receive will come directly into my normal email client. So I don’t have to worry about missing anything.

Having a tool and process in place is essential for being proactive about booking speaking engagements and author appearances. It ensures that you do the right thing at the right time with a minimal amount of effort. It can’t get any easier!

 

What’s the Big Deal about Website Design?

One of the reasons that I love working with WordPress is the infinite possibility and flexibility it offers.

It allows novices and experts alike to create stunning websites worthy of the brand that they represent.

So, why would you bother hiring a website designer if you can do all of this yourself?

It’s the same response that I give to people when they ask why they should use an independent publisher, like our sister organization, Emerald Lake Books, when they can self-publish.

We know what you don’t.

We know the design standards. We know the hidden pitfalls. We know how to develop sites (and books) to avoid potential issues down the road. We know how to select themes, plugins, products and services that will grow with you.

It’s why we go through an intensive interview process before we even begin working on a new site.

We need to understand what you want your site to do now, and what you want it capable of doing three years from now.

We dig deep to learn about your ideal audience, what their needs are, and what we can do to make your site the place they want to visit most out of the millions of websites they could spend their time on.

We learn about your likes and dislikes in terms of branding, colors, layouts, functionality, etc.

And we take all of these factors and more into consideration when we design the site that’s right for you.

More than that, though. We can save you from false starts.

A hard lesson

I recently inherited a client’s website. She’d had a friend create it for her, and was hosting it on a web server owned by the friend of another friend.

When she hired me, she thought she was ready to have the site optimized for SEO. However, upon performing an SEO evaluation for her, it became clear that she did not have what she thought she had purchased.

The “WordPress website” she’d purchased was actually made in Adobe Muse and published to the web host. This meant that only her developer had access to the source files, and my client could not easily update the site herself (a requirement she’d stipulated when she contracted with her friend to do the site in the first place).

The web host she was using was a small outfit that only owned one server. As a result, they were very protective of that single server, knowing that if anything ever happened to it, they were out of business.

When my client’s email address was randomly hacked, the web host went ballistic. Their rants and unprofessional manner of addressing our client’s distress did nothing to resolve the problem. In fact, the web host locked down every single cPanel function and blocked our client’s ability to send and receive email for more than a week, effectively shutting down my client’s business.

Before I could ever do anything about the SEO activities I was hired to do, we had to convert the website from Muse to WordPress, migrate it to a new web host and transfer the domain registry as well, simply to avoid the false starts and poor choices that were unwittingly made at the start.

When you work with a professional web designer, they have the experience necessary to know which services and products they trust and would recommend. If you’re only doing one or two websites for yourself, the chances are, you simply don’t have the same breadth of knowledge necessary to avoid painful lessons.

The periodic table of web design

To gain a fuller understanding of what you get when you work with a website designer, consider this behind-the-scenes look at the web design process. Because that’s what you get when you hire a professional.

Periodic
Periodic Table of Web Design Process – created by
New Design Group

A quick review of LucidPress, FlipSnack and Publitas

Last week, I mentioned a short assessment I did for a friend that looked at LucidPress, FlipSnack and Publitas. (You can see the start of this story in “Putting an End to Overwhelm.”)

I promised those who were interested in the actual assessment that I’d share it this week.

Just to give a little context, a friend had posted on Facebook asking for someone to recommend a magazine designer.

I know a fantastic graphic designer who has the skills necessary to design a magazine, but depending on my friend’s requirements, he might or might not be a good fit.

Evaluating LucidPress, FlipSnack and PublitasSo… I asked some leading questions, trying to determine whether to recommend my designer, figuring at least if I couldn’t recommend someone, others reading the post thread would have more information to jog their thinking with.

These are just a few of the questions I asked:

  • Did she want her magazine to be online, in print or both?
  • Did she want to design her magazine online or upload a PDF that was displayed in an online reader?
  • Did she want flexibility in her design (for enhanced creativity) or did she want a template she could work from (for ease of use)?
  • Did she want just text and images in her magazine or other types of content like video, MP3 and ecommerce options?

The important thing to note here is that the tools I reviewed aren’t just for magazines. They can be used to create any kind of online book. For example, a brochure or catalogue.

Or, if you have a PDF that you want to make available to read online on your website, it provides an attractive reader for it instead of just simply opening the PDF itself. This could potentially allow you to grow your mailing list by granting access to the content, without actually giving them a PDF that could be freely shared with others.

One of the tools in particular also enables you to integrate a shopping experience into the PDF itself, meaning that someon could click on an item they’re interested in, get more product information and see the price, then add it to a shopping cart and purchase it.

As a publisher, I can see many possible uses for that, including a sleek edition of my catalogue that would be embeddable on my Facebook page and website as well as shareable in social media. Nice!

A quick review

Anyway, what follows is my unedited review of the platforms she was curious about, and my reasons for making the final recommendation I did.

LucidPress

Lucidpress is going to have a little less flexibility in terms of design, since it has you create your publication using its templates. You work online and then drag-and-drop content in from social media, DropBox, Google Drive and elsewhere. It makes it easy to use, but limited in its capabilites if you want to “get fancy.”

From there, you can export what you create into a PDF for printing else where. You can also save it as a JPG or PNG (not too certain of the value of that for something that’s multiple pages!), share it on social media and embed it on your site.

It does allow real-time collaborations, so you could have more than one person on your team working on it at a time. But I don’t know how relevant that is to you.

It also offers a revision history of the magazine (possibly not of interest to you) and analytics (which should always be of interest). 

Since it encourages “saving on printing costs” by sharing your publication, I am curious as to how well it handles PDF creation, but that’s one of those things I’d have to test out to know for certain.

I will say that as soon as people start telling me there are templates, it says that they’re targeting a DIY audience.

That’s not a bad thing, but the problem with templates is that it limits your ability to be creative.

For that reason, LucidPress would not be my top choice. (Plus, looking at the magazine templates, I didn’t see anything inspired or inspiring…)

FlipSnack and Publitas

So, next to look at FlipSnack and a competitor that I found this morning, Publitas. Both take a PDF you’ve designed and convert it to an online publication for you. You can then embed that publication on your website and Facebook page. Social sharing is enabled and analytics are available (although depending on your pricing plan, it my only be available for the past few months).

However, I’m leaning more toward Publitas than FlipSnack.

It emphasizes making its product light, meaning that it loads fast and that their focus is on maximizing your page’s display, without adding a heavy frame or navigation to it. If you take a look at their examples, you’ll see what I mean. (I just like the look and feel of the Publitas version more).

Publitas also allows you to include things in your publication that FlipSnack doesn’t seem to offer, like integrating video content into it and adding ecommerce. (You can click on an item for more info and get a pop-up with the product description and price.)

Since this publication is intended to be part of your business model, understanding how you’re going to monetize it is important, and Publitas makes that the easiest to do. You can sell tickets to your next event or course, include affiliate or JV partner resources, etc. directly within the publication.

So, that would be my recommendation. I like its look and feel, ease of use, flexibility, and capabilities.

However, since both FlipSnack and Publitas take a PDF as its source, you could always test them out from the same source and see which one appeals to you more from that standpoint.

I know there’s a lot here, but hopefully, it helps you to make your decision. For what it’s worth, it’s also highly rated on Alternative.to, when you look for alternatives to Issuu. 

So let’s dream a little

With all of the features that are available using tools like these, how might you integrate something like this into your business? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

How many times have you had an idea that doesn’t move forward because you’re caught in the bottleneck of a decision? Feel free to pick my brain and I can help you in the exact same way.

Put an End to the Overwhelm

I hear it all the time. Authors, speakers, entrepreneurs, designers, photographers, small business owners, Realtors, plumbers, job seekers… They are all facing the same problem.

Marketing is time-consuming! Especially when you’re trying to figure it out as you go.

Actually, the whole thing can become simply overwhelming. Since they don’t know where to start, they often don’t get started or they make slower progress than they want and need to.

That’s one of the reasons that I write this blog.

I enjoy helping people find the tools and techniques that really work.

I like to take a specific issue and figure out the best way of fixing it, so that I can then pass it along to my clients and readers.

Whenever possible, I prefer to test things out for my own needs before recommending them to anyone else. But sometimes the best I can do is research it, knowing the needs of my clients, and let you know which I would choose if I were going to be using it.

Know what you want to accomplish

That exact situation came up recently. I was in conversation with a friend on Facebook who was looking for a magazine designer.

Since there are many different approaches that can be taken to designing a magazine, I asked her some leading questions.

  • Did she want her magazine to be online, in print or both?
  • Did she want to design her magazine online or upload a PDF that was displayed in an online reader?
  • Did she want flexibility in her design (for enhanced creativity) or did she want a template she could work from (for ease of use)?
  • Did she want just text and images in her magazine or other types of content like video, MP3 and ecommerce options?

These were just a few of the questions we discussed.

Find the right tools

In this particular context, my friend was looking at potentially using LucidPress to generate her magazine. I’d also found FlipSnack and suggested she compare the two, along with Issuu, which is a popular online document viewer.

She narrowed down her choices to LucidPress and FlipSnack and asked what I thought of them. So, I took a few minutes to look at the features and functionality of both, and to research a few comparison articles to see what existing users thought of them.

What I found was that selecting the right tool was contingent on knowing how you wanted to use it and what you wanted to get out of it. (Isn’t that always the case!)

A wrench is not just a wrench

A field of nuts with one selectedAs an author, speaker or entrepreneur, it’s important to know, first, what your objective is and then, second, what your preferred operating method is, before making a choice about the tools and platforms you want to integrate into your business.

If the tool makes things harder for you, it’s not the right one.

If it limits your ability to achieve your objective, it’s still not the right one.

Look for tools that are the right fit for you.

Don’t just assume that because everyone else is using it, you should too. Everyone else is not you!

I was commenting to my son recently about the wide selection of socket wrench handles hanging on a hardware store wall. You might think that a wrench is a wrench is a wrench. But that’s simply not true.

There are different size wrenches (1/4″, 3/8″, 1/2″, 3/4″, 1″, 1-1/2″, 2-1/2″ and 3-1/2″ to start with), ratcheting and non-ratcheting, fixed socket or interchangeable, metric, standard and Torx sockets, and so on.

Even if you settle on the specific tool you want, you’ll find that one manufacturer’s handle has a different grip than another’s. And while both may be perfectly usable, one fits your hand better than another.

Use the tools that are right for you

The same is true as you build your business. There are plenty of tools out there to work with. But you need to know what job you want to use the tool for (to make sure it has the right functionality to accomplish the task), as well as which one suits you best.

You could have the best tool in the world, but if it’s not something you’re comfortable with, you’re simply not going to use it!

That’s a frequent conversation that I have with my authors.

Which social media platform should I be on?

What is the absolute best method of marketing my book without a budget?

What’s the one thing I should do every day to reach my audience?

There is no “one size fits all” answer to that. It’s unique because you are you and your ideal reader is your ideal reader. You aren’t everyone else.

That’s why it’s critical to develop a marketing strategy that has you, your offering and your market in mind.

It’s also how consulting a marketing strategist can help you create an optimized plan that ensures that your budget is being applied to the activities that will work best for your specific product, goals and audience.

Fitting the pieces together

Connecting the pieces

So, if you are feeling stuck or if your book marketing simply isn’t getting the results you want, I encourage you to book a strategy call with me and get unstuck! I can help you connect the pieces so that you feel confident about your next steps.

Oh, and if you were interested in the outcome of the LucidPress vs. FlipSnack review, check back next week and I’ll share those results.

 

22 Ways to Create Compelling Content When You Don’t Have a Clue [Infographic]

The folks at CopyBlogger have done it again! They’re the experts when it comes to creating great content, and this infographic is no exception.

As they acknowledge, even professional writers sometimes get stuck for content ideas. And the same is true for authors and speakers. There are times when the well simply runs dry.

So, what do you write about then?

I’m hoping the ideas that are shared here will help get those creative juices flowing.

And thanks again, CopyBlogger, for always being willing to share!

22 Ways to Create Compelling Content - Infographic
Like this infographic? Get more content marketing tips from Copyblogger.

Nobody Cares About Your Book! Media Training Insights from TJ Walker

TJ Walker is the host of the #1 rated YouTube Channel devoted to Daily Public Speaking and Media Training Improvement, and a prolific fellow instructor on Udemy.icon

Media Training icon

Media Training for Authors: Promote Your Book in the News

I recently came across a course of his that’s geared specifically to helping authors find and prepare for media appearances. It’s called “Media Training for Authors: Promote Your Book in the News.”icon

Of course, from the author’s perspective, media appearances are about selling more books. Right?

TJ is quick to affirm that if you approach the media from that standpoint, you’re going to get nowhere fast.

Nobody cares about your book!

At least, not anyone beyond you or your family and friends.

So, how do you go about securing media appearances when your ultimate goal is to sell more books?

TJ advises in this course that you don’t make it about the book. Make it about the knowledge and expertise that you have to offer to the media outlet and their audience.

I could say a lot of the standard boilerplate stuff about what makes for a good course here. Insert it all. It applies! The production quality is good. The presenter knows his material. He has all the bases covered in terms of what you’d need to know to successfully pull off your first media appearance. It’s all right there.

What makes this course so good?

What I especially liked about TJ’s content was that he designed the course to be more than just a series of lectures with associated quizzes. Instead, he invites, nay, urges, you to stop the videos and practice what he’s just taught.

The only way to improve your on-screen experiences is to practice being on-screen. So, he gives you a variety of exercises to do through which you grow and learn how to become more appealing to media producers. He’ll even provide feedback on your video if you post it in the discussion area.

TJ also teaches you about finding a hook that captures the attention of producers and appeals to their sense of curiosity. These creative news hooks make it easier for you to get what you ultimately want, which is the exposure that a particular media outlet can give you and your book.

Since publishing this post, TJ has offered my readers
an exclusive discount on his course!
Normally priced at $297, you can buy it for just $9!

Buy Now button - https://alewebsocial.com

You’re not always going to be able to work the book into your interview. There will be times when the most you can hope for is the “soft sell” that goes along with having your book mentioned in your bio for the show. But that’s okay. It’s another piece of content that adds to the publicity of who you are and what you’re about.

One of the key take-aways of the media training course was that producers aren’t going to care so much about your authorship as they do about your expertise.

Now, for non-fiction writers, hopefully you’ve written a book that taps into your area of expertise and your media appearances can easily be pointed back to your book.

When it comes to fiction authors, your expertise may be less closely related to the subject of your book. Perhaps it’s about a specific time-period (the one in which your book is set) or about a given marketing strategy.

Regardless, the media is going to be more interested in your expertise, so figure out what that is and how to clearly communicate it to the producers you reach out to.

The more you make your expertise available to the producers and valuable to them, the more likely they are to mention your book. But it has to be about them and their needs first.

This is just one of the many valuable things TJ has to share in this course. He’s been training people to become better speakers and make the media impact they desire since 1984. So he’s not just some fly-by-night “expert” who decided to post a course on Udemy to see what happens.

He backs his course with his own personal guarantee.

If you take the course, consume all the media training content, and do the exercises that he sets out for you to do, and you still haven’t seen the results you’re after, he will give you one full day of his personal coaching for free. That’s essentially a $10,000 guarantee (the cost of a full day of one-on-one coaching with him).

Of course, you have to put in the work. You have to watch the course, do the exercises, follow through on what he tells you to do. But if, after all of that, you’re still not “getting it,” he’ll help you figure it out.

How’s that for a guarantee?

And, if you have questions at any time during the course, just post your question and he will create a video response for you. The sad thing, in my opinion, is how few people are actually taking advantage of his offer thus far! There are currently 1854 people enrolled in the course, but only 2 or 3 people have actually posted a question asking for feedback.

So, what does the course cover?

TJ teaches you how to:

  • look your best on TV
  • prepare your messaging
  • answer questions
  • speak in sound bites
  • eliminate nerves
  • determine if your interview was effective
  • conduct satellite interviews
  • avoid the top three media mistakes
  • how to avoid saying “um” and “uh”

… and more!icon

Media Training for Authors” consists of over 100 lectures (13.5 hours of content!), as well as bonus interviews with publishing legend Dan Poynter, and access to 5 of TJ’s books on public speaking and media training. And if you buy this course using my special coupon code “taraisgreat,” it’s only $9!

Or you can become the media yourself…

He even gets into how to “become the media” if you’re interested in taking that approach to creating publicity. His position is, the more media exposure you get, the easier it is to sell books.

I asked my friend and NYT best-selling author, Jeffrey Hayzlett, whether he agreed that creating your own media works effectively, since he hosts the C-Suite TV Show “Mind Your Own Business,” and his response was:

“If you want to sell books, the best thing to do is have an engaged community. Now if that is your own show—with lots of viewersthen yes. A mailing list of fans and friends, a social media network where you share and have folks interacting. Then all other activations are a big plus—getting on TV, RADIO, REVIEWS, podcasts, book signings—ALL of it.  BUT its only good if you activate it to a network or engaged community.”

Could it get any easier?

TJ’s course isn’t going to teach you how to create that engaged community, but it is going to show you how to come off looking and sounding your best, and that’s a great place to start. I highly recommend that you buy your copy now!

And, hey… While you’re at it, you may find my own LinkedIn Masteryicon courses effective in helping you build that engaged community. Just enter the coupon code “MediaTraining” in any of my courses to receive a discounted price.

Get Greater Distribution for Your eBook Using Smashwords

For many of us who write, Amazon is the default “go to place.” And that’s for good reason! Statistics show that the majority of sales of digital content comes from there.

However, if you talk with any content creator, they’ll always tell you that you need to find as many ways as possible to extend the life (and expand the reach) of your content. That means finding multiple outlets and various formats that the same information can be disseminated in.

I’ve been hearing about Smashwords for years, but have never taken the time to study or appreciate its unique properties.

Smashwords Udemy course coverRecently, I was spending some time on Udemy, looking at the latest course offerings there and looking for those that might be suitable for my readers, when I came across one called “Self-Publishing with Smashwords.”

I decided to scan the content and listen to the promo video, and by the time I was done with that, I knew I needed to take a closer look.

I introduced myself to the instructor, Jason Matthews, who proved to be a very knowledgeable man when it came to self-publishing with Smashwords.

I took the course and, when all was said and done, here’s the review I left for it.

Udemy Smashwords course review

In 26 lessons, Jason walks you through things like:

  • What makes Smashwords special.
  • Formatting your content for Smashwords.
  • How to handle your Table of Contents so that Smashwords likes it.
  • Special considerations when it comes to cover design.
  • How to choose the right file format for uploading your content to Smashwords.
  • The next steps to take after submitting your content to Smashwords.
  • Publishing extras that will make your work stand out from the others.

In all, there’s about 90 minutes of content to the course.

As is my nature, I listened to most of it at 2x speed, so was done in under an hour, including taking notes. But the great thing about Udemy course content is that the platform makes it very easy to speed up, slow down, pause and take notes, rewind to repeat, and anything else you need to do in order to grasp the content you’re consuming.

So, if you’ve been wondering how to go about expanding the distribution of your self-published content, and you want to see your book on sites like Apple, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Scribd, Library Direct and many more, this course may be just the thing you need in order to break through the barrier that’s been holding you back.

I know distributing The Plan that Launched a Thousand Books is definitely on my end-of-year plan to put on Smashwords!

 

The Science of Pricing Your Books Correctly

I’m often asked by authors how to choose the right price for a book, and there are a number of factors to consider.

The infographic from blog-growth.com (below) shares some of the science behind pricing items (whether big ticket or small). But how does that translate to books? [Scroll to the bottom to find out.]

So, how does that translate to books?

Well, let’s start with the formats you want to offer your book in. I often recommend making it available in at least 3 formats. It’s up to you whether it’s eBook, paperback and audiobook or eBook, paperback and hardcover, but give the prospective reader 3 choices.

As with bracketing, you’ll notice that people will tend toward the moderately priced item.

When you reduce the formats offered to only two, as shown in the decoy pricing segment, people gravitate toward the lower cost option (typically your eBook).

While that’s not a bad thing if you can make up the difference in price by an increase in volume, it’s still something to be aware of. (Amazon offers a Kindle pricing suggestion tool that analyzes the best price point for your book based on the volume of sales for similar titles at various price points.)

I have to admit, I’m a little disappointed that The Magic of 9 only tested 4 and 9. I’ve seen some great activity around 7 as well, especially when it comes to courses, and would have liked to have seen that included in the equation. You’ll have to decide if you want to test that out yourself or not.

As far as Deleting the Free Plan goes, that has bearing on the age-old discussion around whether KDP Free Days are a good idea or not. By itself, I tend to think not. However, there are some great strategies that can be used to leverage the visibility of a free book in order to lead new readers into other purchasing decisions. So, done right, the free offers do have a place in your marketing strategy. I just wouldn’t recommend keeping your offer free for extended periods of time unless there’s some other monetization strategy behind the free content.

What are your thoughts? What jumped out at you about this infographic? Is it in line with what you’ve experienced yourself, or have you seen differing results?

Animoto’s 2015 Video Marketing Cheat Sheet [Infographic]

According to a recent study by Animoto, more than 7 billion videos watched each and every day on Facebook and YouTube.

You can read the press release about the Animoto Online and Social Video Marketing Study to learn more.

However, one thing is clear…

If video content isn’t part of your marketing strategy, you’re missing out! And Animoto is a great way to get started…

Consider this:

  • 4 times as many consumers would rather watch a video about a product than read about it.
  • Customers are nearly 50% more likely to read email newsletters that include links to video.
  • 4 in 5 consumers say a video showing how a product or service works (or what it’s about) is important.

Remember, your book is your product. Your name is your brand. You are your company.

So, how are you going to use video to promote your topic? Share in the comments below!

”2015

Wondering What Theme or Plugin that Site Uses?

Have you ever looked at a website and thought to yourself, Gee, I wonder what plugin they’re using for that? or Wow! I really like that theme. I wonder which one it is?

It doesn’t matter whether you have one website you maintain or scores of them, we all look for inspiration from other websites we like.

The Old Way of Doing Things

Does this story sound familiar to you?

I found a website that did something I liked, but I had no idea what theme or plugin they were using to do it.

So, I right-clicked and selected “View Source,” then scrolled through the source code, hoping I might recognize the part that provides some quasi-identifying information.

Once I found it, I’d Google it, and then try to figure out which of the search results was the one I wanted.

If I was really lucky, after a few minutes, I’d find the right one and I’d be happy.

But if there was more than one thing on the site I liked, I had to go back and repeat this process for each element I wanted to identify. [Read more…]