Does Marketing Feel Overwhelming Sometimes?

I can’t begin to tell you how often I hear these words:

“I know I should be doing more to market my business (book, product, brand, etc.), but I just don’t know where to start!”

Have you ever felt that way?

For many people I talk with, it’s not that they’re afraid of social media or their website or of trying something new. They actually could do these things, but they need someone to tell them what to do, and when to do it.

Does that sound like you?

The Bite Sized Marketer logoIf it does, you may be interested in our newest service that was released this weekend.

It’s called “The Bite-Sized Marketer.”

Here’s what you’ll get:

  • Once a week, you’ll receive a 5-10 minute video tutorial with detailed instructions of something you can implement in an hour or less of your time.
  • You’ll receive bonus materials that help you plan and implement your own marketing activities.
  • You’ll have access to a secret Facebook group where you can ask questions and support each other as we go along.

This service is intended for anyone who doesn’t know where to start with their online marketing, but knows they should be getting started.

The first module of the series will go into detail about using LinkedIn to generate more business, create more partnerships, and establish your expertise. Eventually we’ll cover additional social networks, blogging, and productivity tools and resources I recommend my clients use.

The content will be helpful to anyone who is looking for do-it-yourself instructions, and wants someone to guide them through the process so that they can streamline the marketing process by using those tools and techniques that work, while avoiding those that are time-wasters.

It doesn’t matter whether you are an author, a speaker, an entrepreneur, a job seeker, a student or a corporate employee. The Bite-Sized Marketer is for you!

I am so excited about what we’ve created here that I’m offering a special launch week discount, good for the lifetime of your subscription. Normally, the subscription cost is $47/month, with no minimum contract. You can cancel at any time.

However, if you sign up this week, your cost will only be $37/month for the lifetime of your subscription!

I’m so certain that you’ll see the value in our content that we’re offering a 7-day money-back guarantee as well. Try it out. If you decide it’s not for you, I’ll refund your money; no questions asked.

Marketing doesn’t have to be overwhelming. The Bite-Sized Marketer will take you on a guided journey, showing you how to market online, one bite at a time.

 

Please be sure to share this post with friends, colleagues, job seekers and students who you feel may benefit from receiving in-depth training that they can take at their own pace.

The BookBub Experience

Geraldine Evans Today’s guest post is by Geraldine Evans, a British writer of police procedurals that contain a lot of humour and family drama. She and I met in LinkedIn’s Book Marketing group when she shared her experience using BookBub, a site that alerts interested readers to limited-time free and discounted ebooks matching their interests.

I’ve used BookBub to find new reading material for a couple of years now, but had wondered how it works out from the author’s perspective. When Geraldine shared such a comprehensive review of her experience, I asked her if she’d be willing to do the same thing here for you.

I know there are a lot of numbers involved and that sometimes you’d prefer to avoid those, but they’re worth delving into. So, sit back and enjoy! I promise you, it will get those creative juices flowing.

Are you considering paying for an ad for your book with BookBub? What are you waiting for? Go for it! You’re likely to find it’s worth every penny. Yes, it’s expensive; it was the cost that held me back. Well, that, and the comments on kboards.com/Writers’ Café. According to many members on that forum, getting your book accepted by BookBub was about as likely as flying off on Richard Branson’s spaceship.

But my book was accepted on my very first application. No, I’m not a well-known name. No, I don’t have hundreds of reviews from a dedicated coterie of readers. And I’m definitely not sleeping with the management! And the book for which I wanted the ad is in the mystery/thriller genre, one of their most popular categories. So I had lots of competition.

But, what I think may have worked in my favour is that I was willing to be flexible on my choice of date for the ad. Perhaps, too, the fact that I write mainly in series was also a no-brainer for them. Maybe they assumed I’d be only too willing to pay for further ads for each of the other books in my 15-strong Rafferty & Llewellyn series. They wouldn’t be wrong about that as my experience with them was very positive. [Read more…]

The Importance of Regularly Backing Up Your Work

For writers and speakers, if you’re using any kind of electronic device for your writing, data backup is as important as writing in the first place. Computers crash. House fires occur. Hard drives implode. Hackers destroy and steal.

Data loss is a hard reality to accept when it happens to people whose words aren’t their livelihood. For authors and speakers, however, realizing that your work is lost to the ages can be unbearable.

Luckily, the days of disks, hard drives and blank CDs are over. Cloud storage presents an easy, and often free, alternative. Even better, it puts the responsibilities of storage and security on a third party and gives authors and writers the mobility they need to succeed.

The Importance of Regularly Backing Up Your Work - Aleweb Social Marketing

Cloud storage offers mobility and security for writers and speakers.

Why Cloud Storage?

When you store your work locally, you own the responsibility of keeping it safe and secure. Also, if you want to bring your work with you, you have to physically bring your work with you – or email it to yourself.

By hosting your data remotely, a professional service dedicated only to data storage takes over. They host your work on servers or databanks that are temperature controlled, protected both digitally and physically and available to you any time from anywhere. Cloud storage allows you to access your work from all your devices, or any computers, with nothing more than a password. [Read more…]

How I Got More Book Reviews Using Story Cartel

StoryCartel logoI’m often asked by my clients how to go about getting book reviews for their latest title. I have a few of my own ideas, but thought I’d open up the question to members of the Book Marketing group on LinkedIn. It was there that I learned about a site I’d never heard of before called Story Cartel. I thought you might like to hear about it too.

If you are willing to offer your book in digital form on Story Cartel for 30 days, and can offer $30 worth of Amazon gift cards for a contest, volunteers will download your book (for free), read it, post an honest book review on Amazon (and wherever else you request), notify Story Cartel of their review, and then be entered into a drawing for one of the gift cards. There are three winners (that’s why 3 are needed).

The idea intrigued me, but I wanted to make sure it was worthwhile before recommending it to my readers. [Read more…]

Book Review: The Millionaire Map by Jim Stovall

The Millionaire Map by Jim Stovall, cover imageAs I was posting my own book for review on StoryCartel this weekend, I saw that Jim Stovall’s latest book, The Millionaire Map, was available for review as well. Knowing Mr. Stovall’s work from his great movie, The Ultimate Gift, and another of his books, The Lamp, I eagerly grabbed a copy, excited to read it.

Little did I realize at the time that it was exactly what I needed to read right now.

Less than 24 hours later, with 6 pages of notes by my side, I’d read all 160 pages of the book.

I found myself frequently posting quotations from it to my Facebook friends, and sending personal notes to specific friends whom I knew would benefit from reading his thoughts as well.

Mr. Stovall was hitting on the same struggles and sticking points that my friends and I have been sharing of late, and it was great to have the wisdom and insight of someone who has been where we are, leading us to where we want to go.

[Read more…]

How to Publish a Book with Limited Cash

My clients often tell me that they want to publish their book, but they’ve got limited cash to do it with. So, their dream of being a published author and seeing their book in print sits on the back-burner waiting for the additional cash to be freed up.

Aleweb Social Marketing - How to Publish Your Book with Limited Cash

Publish your book even on a shoestring budget

Unfortunately, for many, that day never comes!

I found myself in that situation when I wanted to publish my first book, autographed paperback. So, I know the feeling, and the burden that goes along with thinking “If only…”

However, I was determined to see how far I could get, despite my lack of funds at the time. Amazingly, there’s a lot you can do to publish your book on a shoestring budget if you’re willing to put in the time to do the work yourself.

Having self-published 5 books now, I have to admit that I like the amount of control I have when I create the book listing myself rather than letting someone else do it for me. [Read more…]

5 Books on Building Personal Brands That Everyone Should Read

Today’s guest post is from Kelsey Castle is a freelance writer and editor who focuses on small business topics. She has a degree from Penn State and lives in Maryland.

There are a lot of opportunities out there for someone who’s motivated. However, it can be hard to get noticed. Your personal brand refers to who you are, what you’re passionate about, and the strength of your reputation.

Aleweb Social Marketing - 5 Books on Building Personal Brands That Everyone Should Read Pic 1

Learn more about developing your personal brand with an expertly written book.

If you’re still trying to figure out your personal brand, investing time in reading a top-rated book might put you on the right track.

Career Distinction: Stand Out by Building Your Brand
By William Arruda and Kirsten Dixson

Sometimes it’s not enough to just tell you how to build a brand, but to show you as well. This book includes case studies of successful professionals who have defined their brand and used it to their advantage in the workplace.

Authors Arruda and Dixon offer a step-by-step guide to identify your target audience, tell your brand story, express yourself clearly and consistently, and understand the importance of online reputation management. The book comes from a duo that are widely respected in the career-coaching community. [Read more…]

When Social Networking Does Good

I’ve been providing social marketing services for three years now. Yet, one of the things I’ve seen a significant increase in this year has been the ability of social communities to rally together for a good cause. Whether it’s spreading news or raising funds, there is no parallel to how rapid a message can spread when shared over social networks.

In my local area, since August, lost dogs have been found, runaway children have been restored to their families, news of a long-time family friend’s passing quickly spread, a kidnapped child was returned safely to his guardians, and an online community formed to support two families whose lives were devastated by a home gas explosion.

When the tragic shootings took place in Sandy Hook (a neighboring community to where I live) on Dec. 14th, 2012, news spread like wildfire over the social networks. As always, I found Twitter to be the best source of news. Facebook couldn’t keep up with or spread the information quickly enough because of its closed nature. But with a few appropriately placed hashtags, I could find out everything I wanted to know as it was unfolding; actually, more than I wanted to know since my own children’s schools were also on lock-down until the situation was under control.
eMarketing Association logo
What I didn’t know until today was that the very next day, a colleague of mine suffered a tragedy in his own family. Robert Fleming is CEO of the eMarketing Association, an organization whose conferences I have spoken at over the past couple of years. It’s related LinkedIn group is the 4th largest group on that network, out of over 1.5 million groups!

On Dec. 15th, his 12-year-old daughter suffered an illness and was paralyzed from the neck down. Within 5 hours’ time, she went from being perfectly healthy to being completely paralyzed, unable to eat, speak or breathe on her own. She still remains in the ICU at this time. But is in good spirits. A website to chart her progress will be up and running in another day or two at rhanasjourney.com.

While the information I have is limited and the family deserves its right to privacy as it deals with these difficult circumstances, Robert is hoping to see good come out of this circumstance regardless. On LinkedIn today, he shared an announcement with the eMarketing Association Network group.

100% of all profits from conference registrations, certifications, sponsorships, memberships and ecourses will be contributed to a fund in [his daughter’s] name, for her care, now through the end of January.

With this offer, you’ll be able to hone your eMarketing skills as you prepare for 2013, and know that you are helping a little girl heal at the same time. So, why not take a moment and make an investment in both her and yourself. See what the eMarketing Association has to offer today. And, as Robert finished his announcement, “Our best wishes to you for a fantastic new year.”

Do You Have a Social Media Will?

[10/29/2015 Update: The government article referenced below
has since been taken down, although the content is still relevant.]

I know… I know… This post is a bit off topic for my usual social media writing. I’m not going to teach you today how to do any neat things with your social profiles. I’m not going to recommend new sites or tools to play with. (Well… maybe I’m not). Instead, what I’m going to do is pose a very important question.

Do you have a social media will?

You may be wondering to yourself, “what the heck is she talking about?” But bear with me for a minute. In April 2012, the U.S. government updated their Personal Finance article about writing a will. Their updated recommendation got a lot of folks in the social media world buzzing because they added a section about writing a “Social Media Will.”

Pundits considered what this might look like and discussed the potential issues involved in writing one. For example, a will is a legal document and, as such, it is a matter of public record. Part of the challenge is, you’re supposed to provide your social media executor with a list of all your social profile user names and passwords along with instructions as to what you’d like done with them. Obviously, you don’t want those as part of any public record!

In addition, good internet protocol requires regularly updating your passwords, and new sites come along all the time requiring new accounts and related passwords. So how do you keep your social media directive up-to-date?

While no one likes to think of their own demise, this topic hit home for me when my fiance died late last year. While he wasn’t “into” social media, he did have multiple e-mail accounts, a blog, and a couple of social profiles out there. He was also moderator of a very active Yahoo Group. I was thankful that he had given me his e-mail password long ago, and that ultimately allowed me to identify and access his other accounts.

It came to mind for me again this week when Tony Robbins’ long-time business partner, Chet Holmes, passed away on August 13, and a friend of mine, Howard Tuckey, posted on Facebook the same day about discovering that an online friend of his had passed away. Howard and I got talking about how some of the friendships we develop online are as real and as lasting as those we have in person, even though we may never actually meet in person. Some even become like family, or “eKin,” to us.(By the way, Howard and I have been online friends since the late ’80s, and we’ve never met — that we can recall — there was that TEXTMOOT we may have jointly attended…)

Anyway, as we discussed how it is that online friends find out about the passing of another, Howard and I thought of a few different ideas. Of course, out of respect for families and legal due process, such announcements should be initiated by the family or with their permission, however, it would be an interesting element to cover in a social media will. Why not, in addition to leaving account names, passwords and disposition instructions, leave instructions as to how friends connected with those accounts are to be informed of one’s death?

So, here’s what I propose a social media will consist of. But please note, I’m not a lawyer and haven’t run this past a lawyer, so there may be some flaw in it. Don’t sue me!

RoboformRather than writing out all the profile names, passwords and instructions for each site, use a tool like Roboform to manage your account information. (You can download a copy here.)

  1. In the Notes section for each entry, specify what you want done with the account in the event of your death, and if and how connections to the account should be notified.
  2. Store the password to your Roboform account with your legal documents in a safe place, making sure that your social media executor knows where it is stored.
  3. Make sure it stays current as you change your Roboform password.

The nice thing about using Roboform in this way is that your account can be accessed from any computer, so long as the person has your account and password info for it. This way, even family members who live halfway across the country can process your instructions without having access to your computer.

Adding HTML Code to Your WordPress Page, Post or Widget

Many WordPress users find it easy to get started because the Visual editor is similar enough to Word that they feel comfortable getting started. But what about those times when you are provided with HTML code to add to your site? If you copy and paste it into the post or page using the Visual editor, it comes out as text, not code. So you lose the functionality of the code, and it ends up looking like this:

<a href="http://bit.ly/OWHS4O">
<img src="https://leadchangegroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/The-
Character-Based-Leader-197x300.png?84cd58">
</a>

Here’s how to add functioning HTML code to your WordPress page or post.

 

The result will look like this:

 

If you want to add it to the sidebar instead, you have to add a text widget to the sidebar and paste the code in there instead. Here’s how to do that.