How to Promote Your Book Online – A DIY Guide

The Plan that Launched a Thousand Books by Tara Alemany of Aleweb Social Marketing - https://alewebsocial.comMany authors I know struggle with what the next steps are after they’ve finished all the writing work. They search the internet and book stores for “how to” guides to get them started with marketing and promotion, but many of the ones that are available either are incomplete or lack the level of detail required to do it yourself.

Until now, that is… Like any entrepreneur, I listen to my clients and look for those common issues they encounter; the questions I answer on a regular basis. The need I kept hearing over and over again was for a Do-It-Yourself guide to book marketing. And now it’s here!

Introducing The Plan that Launched a Thousand Books!

Within its first 24 hours on Amazon, it is already ranked in the Top 100 for both of its categories. So, it must be resonating with my readers as well!

I have taken my extensive training and technical writing experience to create a comprehensive, 89-page, easy-to-understand eBook that you can use all by yourself. I have spent as much as $27 on book marketing materials in the past that turned out to be simply lists of things you needed to do with lots of white space around them and no additional information to get you started. That’s not useful! So, that’s not what you’ll get in this eBook. (If you like to figure it all out on your own, let me know and I can point you to some of those books.)

For each marketing strategy I outline, I discuss various considerations for the option, and recommend tools and techniques. This allows you to make informed decisions about what you are capable of doing, and where you might want to get a little help. (Of course, Aleweb is always here to support you!)

So, if you or someone you know is an author and book sales are not what they should be, consider picking up a copy of The Plan that Launched a Thousand Books today! It could be the best $9.99 you’ve ever spent. But you won’t know until you try it. 🙂

If you dobuy a copy and would like me to autograph it, you can request a Kindlegraph here.

 

If you are a blogging book reviewer and are interested in reviewing this eBook, please send a review copy request to info@alewebsocial.com with your name, blog address and preferred format (Kindle or .pdf).

Storifying Your Story

As many of my regular readers know, I am completely in favor of reusing good content in new and existing ways to increase the visibility of that content on the Web. If you’ve been reading me for some time now, you’ll also know that I believe in being a Go Giver. I don’t mean to hurt anyone’s feelings, but when you’re in business or marketing a product, it’s not about you. The key to success is in the relationships you build, and the value you provide.

That can turn into a lot of work if you think you need to do something different for each person you connect with. But sometimes, if a gift is thoughtful, the same thing can be given to multiple people. Now I’m not talking about giving all of your friends and family the Leg Lamp from A Christmas Story. I’m talking about giving them something they can use at their convenience and to their benefit; something that when they’re done, they think of you with gratitude.

Many of my author clients find themselves in positions where they are interviewed on radio, they speak at a conference, or participate in TweetChats. For many people, once the material goes “out into the Ether,” that’s it. The moment has passed and it’s on to the next project.

Yet, these days, radio content and conference materials have their own designated Twitter hastag or are shared on Facebook and other platforms. (For more on how hashtags work, check out Hashtags Demystified.)Sometimes the conversations move so quickly, it can be hard to thread all the information together in a way that’s easy to understand, though.

Or if you’re at a conference, you may want to offer a conference momento with photos, tweets, and video content from the best speakers.

Generosity is rewarded time-and-time again. Taking the extra few minutes to show that you enjoyed the experience and were thankful to participate generates warm feelings directed toward you.

So, what to do, what to do?

There’s a tool that can help you repurpose that material, and shape it into a format that fellow participants will enjoy, and those who weren’t there can still feel like they were part of the experience!

The answer is Storify. This site allows you to pull in content from Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, Instagram, Google, and to embed a URL. You can add the content to your story in any order you choose, including creating actual threads for the conversations that took place in all these sources. You can also add your own text to the story, and be as creative as you’d like with it! If there are off-topic conversations taking place, you can leave those out of the story to create a tight and useful resource for your readers.

When you’re done, publish the story and Storify will prompt you to notify any of the featured contributors to the story. You can also add anyone else you’d like to have notified as well, which makes it easier for the story to reach a broader audience.

I recently participated in a #BookPro TweetChat. We had some great lines of conversation going all at once. Storifying the content (like my new verb?) enabled me to reorder the conversations into easy-to-read snapshots.

Now, I could have stopped there, and just shared it with those whom I notified directly. But Storify lets me take it even further. I can then export my story to a number of different platforms, including WordPress (both free and self-hosted sites), Tumblr, Drupal, Posterous and MailChimp. Alternatively, I can use the embed code to add the story to my own site. This allows me to share the content with the rest of my network via my blog and mailing list.

So, the next time you’re creating content, whether it’s live or online, give some thought to how you can create a larger audience reusing that content. After all, we all know how time-intensive it can be to create something from scratch. So, why not leverage existing content to the fullest extent, and then continue to share new, great content from there!

In the meantime, enjoy my #BookPro story! And if you’re an author looking for more great ideas like this, you may want to purchase my eBook The Plan that Launched a Thousand Books.

 

Why Pinterest Should Interest You

We’ve all heard the saying that a picture’s worth a thousand words, right? Why is that? There’s just something visually engaging about an image that makes people want to interact with it. Bloggers know to add an image or video to their posts to increase engagement. Facebookers know that posts with images of some kind (previews, photos, etc.) receive more likes and comments.

Well, the new social network, Pinterest (still in beta release), takes that concept and blows it out of the water. Image a network that’s driven by imagery. Engagement explodes. People virally share, or “pin,” the images so that their own network sees them too. They can be embedded on blogs, like the one in this post. Or they can be shared on Facebook, tweeted on Twitter and even e-mailed!

What is Pinterest

But Pinterest is so much more than the image may lead you to believe. Each pinned item has a link leading back to the source, whether that’s a spot on your blog, a photo album, etc. Suddenly, Pinterest becomes a ready-made vehicle for broadcasting your message to a completely different audience than the one you already have. And since the “repinning” that takes place is focused around categorized topics, it’s easy to find others who share your same interests and are willing to spread the word to their followers!

Every user in Pinterest creates their own bulletin boards that they post images to. These are usually focused around categories like cars, kids, nature, pets, food, inspirational messages, books, music, travel, etc.

Whether you’re an author, photographer, realtor, chef, landscape architect, home organizer, interior decorator, builder, website designer, artist, social media maven or what-have-you, you should be using Pinterest. Create boards that are relevant to the audience you want to attract. Then start filling your boards with visual content (in this case, pictures and video).

Do you have a portfolio? Show it off on Pinterest. Are you an author? Share your book cover image, as well as photos, sketches or other drawings related to the setting of your book. Or take brief, inspiring excerpts and create an image from them to share (like the one above). Have video you want to get out there? Create a board of your videos as well. Have products you want to sell? Pin an image of your product with a link back to the site where they can purchase it, whether that’s on Etsy, your website, Amazon, eBay, or elsewhere. Are you a realtor? Create a board for each town you sell in, and post images and video from your listings. The options are only limited by your imagination.

Looking for new content or something to blog about? Find and follow other “Pinners” who inspire you. Join in the discussions taking place about each image. Share your thoughts and ideas, and engage authentically.

Oh! And did I mention that by default, your Pinterest activity is visible to the search engines? So, it’s yet another source of SEO for the sites that are being linked to…

But be warned! Pinterest is addictive! And keep in mind that Pinterest is not about self-promotion so much as it is another social network. As with any social platform, etiquette requires that you keep self-promotion to a minimum. Consider the audience you’re looking to attract and share the content that’s going to interest them. Not every pin should go back to your website. Share what others are pinning, and what you find elsewhere on the internet.

If you aren’t using the site yet and want an invitation to join (since it’s still in beta release), let me know and I’ll send one out to you. If you are using Pinterest already, be sure to follow me and say “hello!”

What do you think of Pinterest? Post your thoughts below, and feel free to share your favorite pin if you have one!

Book Review: The Micro-Script Rules

The Micro-Script RulesI met author Bill Schley at the eMarketing Association’s Power of eMarketing conference in October this year, where we were both presenting. When he found out that I’m a blogger and sometimes do book reviews on my site, he gladly offered me a copy of his book, The Micro-Script Rules, in exchange for a review. The one catch? Well, he signed my copy with “Remember! You must blog or no Santa!”

I had every intention of reading and reviewing the book in November, as I’d originally told Bill. So I must start my review with an apology to the author… It’s Christmas week, and I’m still hoping that Santa will come! So, please accept this review and my apologies; unexpected life events side-tracked me for a time, which caused a backlog on my writing calendar.

That aside, let me tell you the key point of this book.

 It’s not what people hear.

It’s what they repeat…

Having told you that, you may think that there’s no reason to read the book now. Even the author suggests, after the first page, that all you really need to know is that the right 5 words always beats 5,000. He acknowledges that stories are more important to tell than ever, but that you need to know how to tell them in one line or less. That’s pretty much the central topic of the book.

If you already know that and have mastered the art of storytelling in one line or less, there’s no need for you to read the rest of the book. But for those of us who aren’t master storytellers yet, Bill offers the remaining 150+ pages that serve two great purposes. First, they use descriptive text and examples to identify what a micro-script is, how it’s used, and why it’s important. Then, the book goes on to help you develop the micro-scripts you need for your own purposes.

The clarity of the instruction and easy writing style of the author makes it a simple read, but a valuable addition to anyone’s book shelf whether you’re in business, or wanting to attract attention for other reasons. (I can see this being a great resource for teachers!)

So, if you’re looking to improve your storytelling skills in 2012 or to create great micro-scripts, based on your dominant selling idea, that people will want to share, this is the book that will help you to do just that. It’s one that I am definitely happy to have added to my bookshelf.

Following the author’s guidance enabled me to generate a new title my forth-coming eBook that is highly memorable as well as shareable. So, instead of telling my readers to be on the look-out for “How to Launch Your New Book Online” (boring!), I can tell them that they need to pounce on “The Plan that Launched a Thousand Books” as soon as they see it! Which title would you prefer sharing?

While You Were Reading…

Morning readingIf you’re like me, when you settle in at your computer in the morning, getting ready to start your work, you spend a little time checking out what the hot topics of the day are! I mean, if my newsfeed and inbox are going to be filled with this stuff, I want to know what everyone’s talking about! Is this “me” time? Well, it could be, if I don’t do anything with it. But wouldn’t my own followers and clients be interested in some of what I’m reading too? After all, they’re connected with me because they value what I have to share!

The problem is that I don’t want to bombard my readers with tweeting and posting all that content at once. They’ve got their own busy newsfeeds and inboxes to take care of.

So, here’s what I do…

First, I’m selective about what I share. I don’t simply share everything I read. I share the links that I think my audience will find useful.

Second, I use the BufferApp extension for Google Chrome in order to create a “buffer” of content that the system periodically tweets and posts for me, based on a schedule I predefine. While this currently only works with Facebook (pages as well as profiles) and Twitter, it’s still quick and easy to use. I can even highlight some of the text in the article I’m reading (including my own comments!) and click the Buffer icon in my toolbar in order to add it to the queue.

While I’m a big fan of Hootsuite and have used it almost exclusively up to this point, what I like about the BufferApp is how quick and easy it is to use. Since I define my posting schedule ahead of time, I don’t have to schedule each thing I add to the buffer. I just fill ‘er up and away she goes!

Third, I use the content I’m sharing to generate visibility for me and my business, either by commenting on the existing blog post (if my thoughts are short enough), or writing a responding blog post for my own website.

Therefore, the time I spend during my day keeping up with industry information is maximized time. I’m learning new things, my clients and followers have a great source of curated content, and I’m increasing the visibility for my website while establishing my expertise. Not a bad way to start the day, especially as I’m sipping my coffee with Peppermint Mocha creamer! (I love this time of year!)

Book Review: Social Media Judo

Social Media Judo coverWhen I was offered the opportunity to review a book entitled “Social Media Judo” by Chris Aarons, Geoff Nelson, Nick White and Dan Zehr, I jumped at the chance. I was informed that the book was written by Ivy Worldwide, an award-winning agency for effectiveness, and revealed the secrets to revenue-driving social media campaigns.

Any effective social marketer knows that this is more than just collecting friends and followers on Facebook and Twitter. There’s a real art and style that goes into effectively marketing on the internet, and cutting through the clutter of videos, social networks, blogs and more that clamor for the attention of a prospective consumer.

The book promised to give a deep insight into how top worldwide brands (such as HP, Lenovo, Microsoft) are having success with social media and how they are using it to drive sales and revenue. As a martial artist and a student of social marketing myself, I loved the idea of blending the philosophy and mindset of martial arts with the mechanics of word-of-mouth marketing to generate real results.

The style of martial arts that I study is a Korean form called Tang Soo Do (most closely related to Tae Kwon Do, and the same style that Chuck Norris studied prior to founding Chun Kuk Do). In it, there are 7 tenets that we highly value: Integrity, Concentration, Perseverance, Respect & Obedience, Self-Control, Humility, and Indomitable Spirit. As I waited for my copy of the book to arrive, I thought perhaps these were some of the topics that would be touched upon.

Instead, Social Media Judo focused on four, just-as-important pillars to judo and the philosophy of social marketing.

  1. Minimum effort and maximum efficiency – Tapping into the network of key influencers already in place to use their existing momentum to help spread your message.
  2. Mutual benefit – Crafting programs that generate a strong return for the company by also provide an equally beneficial outcome for the influences and partners with whom you work.
  3. Etiquette – Creating personal relationships with online content producers and influencers, rather than merely trying to exploit them when you need them.
  4. Physical education – Building a bridge between philosophy and practice. The judo mindset challenges the ways you think about and interact with your key influences, both on- and offline.

The book demonstrates, through real-world examples, how important it is to master the philosophy as well as the mechanics of these techniques. As the authors point out, “You can’t merely mimic the moves of a judo expert and expect to become a great fighter.”

As you read through the book, it also covers the importance of falling, and the view of it that students must learn to adopt in order to adapt. By learning about how to fall properly, companies can overcome their fear of failing with social media, and derive lessons from the experience that enable them to see the upside that’s possible, even in the risk of the downside. When these risks are mitigated through traditional marketing efforts and effective planning, the potential that exists is huge for any company! You’ll also learn the basics of marketing, along with strategies to maintain the balance between “going with the flow” and keeping your message intact.

Each of the examples that are given, and the analysis that goes into why they worked or didn’t work, is invaluable. By studying them, marketers can begin to develop their own plans to increase sales, cut marketing costs, and boost engagement, all while paying for themselves with real revenue!

If I had any real criticism of the book to offer, it’s that it neglects social networks beyond blogging. But the thought there is that it gives your key influences a larger platform that can ultimately be promoted using other social networks. So, they become a means to an end, instead of the destination themselves.

Overall, the book is well-written and useful! There’s something in it for both novice marketers and more experienced individuals, and I wouldn’t be surprised if you get something more out of it on subsequent readings. It’s definitely a book I’m happy to add to my Social Marketing bookshelf!

Book Review: What Color Is Your Parachute?

Parachute Cover

As a child back in the early ‘70s, I can still remember my father coming home with a book one day whose title jumped out at me. It was a title that seemed silly and compelling all at the same time. “What Color Is Your Parachute?” I’d never been interested in one of my Dad’s books before. But this one caught my attention… Did the color of parachutes mean something? Was there some great mystery that would be revealed as the final pages of this book were read? I have to admit, I didn’t find out the answer to that question until much later…

I recently had the opportunity to review the 40th anniversary edition of “What Color Is Your Parachute?” by Richard N. Bolles, and decided to follow up on that missed opportunity from decades ago. And am I glad that I did!

Dick Bolles has revised and updated his book almost every year since it was first released, ensuring that it remains current and relevant to today’s job seeker. But this book is also a book for truth seekers, which is why my Dad had first picked it up. He was employed, and wasn’t looking for a new job. But he recognized that his young life hadn’t gone exactly as he’d hoped thus far, and he wanted to figure out the reasons why.

As Dick Bolles walks you through the things you need to know as part of a modern-day job search, he also provides exercises that help you to know yourself more, and in so doing, to find that job that is ideally suited to you. He covers how to find hope, deal with depression, and survival skills you need in today’s world, how to deal with handicaps (real or imagined), how to find job vacancies, whether or not resumes are still relevant, how to network using social media and in real life, tips for interviewing and salary negotiation, what you need to know before you start your own business, why being inventive is key to survival, and how to choose a new career. Exercises help you to look closely at the skills that you enjoy using the most, finding your mission in life and coming to know yourself better, and then figure out how to transfer those skills into a career. But it doesn’t stop there, because then you need to teach someone else how to do the same.

One of many statements that jumped out at me was that the key to hope is that, in every situation, we have to have at least two alternatives. So long as two alternatives exist, there’s always a reason to hope. The greatest thing about that is that hope gives you wings, persistence and energy to face whatever challenge you may find before you.

After reading this book, I can understand why my father turned to it when he was trying to figure his own life out. We all go through periods of doubt where we wonder why our lives didn’t turn out the way we’d planned on, and how to get back on track to living a fulfilling, meaningful life. While Dick’s book is specifically geared towards the job seeker, the same principles can be used by the entrepreneur, the student working on college entrance applications, the retiree, and anyone else interested in discovering a more satisfying life.

 

Review: Is the WordPress Plug-in Backup Creator Worth the Price?

Backup Creator logoFor those of you who don’t know, I’m a big fan of using WordPress, not only to blog, but to create websites. My own site, and those of clients whose sites I create, are all WordPress-based.

However, when I decided to migrate from WordPress.com to a self-hosted WordPress site earlier this year, I found the whole experience to be a major hassle. The theme I use is still not working the way I’d like it to, since there are plug-ins I used on the old site that no longer function here.

Have you had a similar experience? Maybe you weren’t migrating your site. Perhaps you were recreating it because it crashed, got hacked, or otherwise failed on you? For a business owner, it’s a huge headache! Between the cost of having someone recreate it, and the headache of going through the restoration process, it’s enough to turn any day into a “not so good” one…

A blogger I follow recently did a review of a WordPress plug-in called “Backup Creator.” I clicked on his link, and watched the promo video, but didn’t really feel I had a good enough sense of the plug-ins usability, pertinence, etc. At $37 for the tool, I didn’t want to buy something that was going to be a waste of time and money. So, the browser window stayed open, and every time I restarted my computer, the video played again.

After sometime of playing this game, I decide to spend some time today going through and looking at all those open browser windows. (This wasn’t the only one… It’s a bad habit of mine to open windows with the intent of coming back to them. But I never do until my computer starts struggling under the load.) So, today was the day I sought out reviews for this product.

At this time, I can say that the reviews were the only disappointment to me thus far! There were lots of them, but they were all identical… I’m all for syndication, but not in this form! None of the posts were attributed to a specific writer, but they all were in first person, and told a personal story.

Thankfully, I stuck with the search and hit a pot of gold! Not only did I find a legitimate review, but it included video instruction as well. After spending the 12 minutes watching Roger Easlick’s video and reading through his review, I felt that the plug-in was sufficiently demonstrated in terms of its ease of use, and that it was something I could easily do myself.

So, I went back to my original window (sorry, Roger!), purchased the plug-in, installed it on my system, and backed up my site. And, yes, it was as easy as Roger made it look.

I also restored my site to a temporary location, and got everything I wanted from it with few small exceptions. First, the site’s heading needed to be reset. It simply showed the domain name. Second, the stats for my ShareThis plug-in are no longer available. But, all comments, plug-ins, widgets, configurations, database info, blog posts, categories, tags, images, etc. were successfully restored to the new site. All this in less than 15 minutes! Now the peace of mind and potential future time-savings are worth the $37!

Just so you know though, the price is due to go up soon. The creator of the plug-in plans to raise the price to $97 in increments over the next few months. Within the past 90 days, the price was only $7! So, if you’re interested in getting this for your site, don’t waste time like I did. Do your due diligence now, watch Roger’s video if you need more information, and come back here to click the affiliate link below!

 

I want my copy of Backup Creator!

Book Review: “The Final Summit” by Andy Andrews

I first “discovered” Andy Andrews when he started following me on Twitter. (He’s @AndyAndrews.) Exploring his website led me to The Noticer Project, a nationwide movement to “notice” the five most influential people in your life. From that point onward, I was hooked on everything he did. I’ve since read all of his books, heard him speak in person, watched many of his videos, and always look forward to his next project. So, I was thrilled when his publisher, Thomas Nelson, gave me the opportunity to review his latest book.

The Final Summit book coverSo, let me ask you this… If you were able to travel through time meeting some of the greatest leaders throughout history, what would you hope to learn from them? In Andy’s book “The Traveler’s Gift,” the main character, David Ponder, gets just such an opportunity at the absolute lowest point in his life. Through the course of this New York Times bestseller, he meets King Solomon, Abraham Lincoln, Harry Truman, Columbus, Anne Frank, Joshua Chamberlain and the archangel Gabriel to learn The Seven Decisions for Success that shaped their lives.

David then spends the next 28 years applying The Seven Decisions to his life and business, benefiting himself, his family, and countless other people around him. His success hit a snag at one point, only to rise to even greater heights as he embraces Truman’s lesson that “Adversity is preparation for greatness.”

In the sequel, “The Final Summit,” David Ponder’s world has once again been shaken. His beloved wife, Ellen, suddenly and unexpectedly dies in her sleep, and he’s at a complete and total loss without her.

It’s at this point that David learns that all of history’s Travelers are being gathered together for one last summit meeting that he is to lead, and the fate of the world hangs in the balance. Centuries of greed, pride and hate have sent mankind hurtling towards disaster, and far from its original purpose. The question is simple, “What does humanity need to do, individually and collectively, to restore itself to the pathway toward successful civilization?” The answer? Only two words… But can the greatest minds in all of history find the right ones?

Hal Sutton, the PGA champion, describes the book this way: “Is it possible to mix C.S. Lewis, Alfred Hitchcock and Tony Robbins? The Final Summit is a unique and powerful blend of mystery and suspense, and principles and emotional fire. Wow! Bring your highlighter to this party. You’ll want to remember every word!”

I couldn’t agree more! As with the first book, I learned fascinating bits of history and the roles that specific individuals played in affecting the outcomes. But I also was led to explore my own thoughts and feelings about the very same topics that the book’s characters were wrestling with. Are leaders perfect? When they fail, are they still a great leader? How can one seemingly minor choice influence the course of history? Can the wisdom of the past unlock the secrets of success today? Are my day-to-day actions really all that significant? Do I agree with the Summit’s final answer?

The book is an easy and enjoyable read. (I received it on Friday and was finished on Sunday, and I did do other things this weekend besides read.) But it’s the kind of book that you’ll want to refer to over and over again, and it can only serve to guide you in your efforts to become a better leader and individual. So, I highly recommend reading “The Traveler’s Gift,” “The Final Summit” and, for a little extra practice, “Mastering the Seven Decisions.” You won’t be disappointed!

Interested in reading “The Final Summit?” Thomas Nelson has been kind enough to provide me with an extra copy to give to one of my readers. Leave a comment below with your two-word answer to the question “What do you do when you don’t know what to do?” and why you think it’s the right thing to do. You’ll be entered into our drawing to receive a free copy of “The Final Summit!” (The drawing will be on June 7th.)

Want to learn more about Andy and his life-changing books? Follow him on Facebook or visit his website.

“In reading about the lives of great people, I found that the first great victory most of them won was over themselves.” ~ David Ponder

Hashtags Demystified…

[Update: As of January 9th, 2012 TwapperKeeper is now fully integrated with the HootSuite dashboard. This means the core functionality you now enjoy for archiving your tweets is available alongside your other social networks and profiles. ]

A friend of mine called me up earlier today and said “Can you tell me about this hashtag thing? I really need to understand it for my business, and haven’t a clue where to start.” Rather than keeping the information between “just the two of us,” I decided to write a quick post and show you just what hashtags are capable of doing.

Hashtags are a quick and easy way of organizing information on Twitter. Due to some tools that allow you to post on multiple social networks at once (like Hootsuite and TweetDeck), you’ll find hashtags used on other social networks as well, but they were first used with Twitter and there are Twitter-related sites that make them extremely powerful. Thus, the examples I use in this blog post will all be Twitter-oriented.

So, first – What is a hashtag? Wiktionary defines it as: A tag embedded in a message posted on a microblogging service, consisting of a word within the message prefixed with a hash sign (#).

Now that that’s clear, let’s move on. Oh! Wait! It didn’t make sense? Okay. Let’s try again. If I want to highlight certain terms in a tweet as keywords in my text, I start them with a hash sign. The combination of the hash sign and the word that immediately follows it is my “hashtag.” So, when I tweet something about my brand (Aleweb Social Marketing), I use a hashtag of #Aleweb to highlight that keyword.

A common use of hashtags is to refer to virtual and real-world events (like TweetChats, conferences, SXSW, etc.). People interested in finding out what everyone’s saying about that event will search for the hashtag and see a running stream of commentary filtered on that one subject. Brown Estate, a winery in Napa Valley, created the #brownzin hashtag to put on the label of their 2009 Napa Zin label to facilitate conversation among the various people who enjoy that particular wine, and they’re tweeting about it to this very day!

Job seekers in Connecticut may want to watch the hashtag pair “#jobs #ct” or “#hiring #ct” to learn more about openings that exist within the state. You can filter that further by adding a tag for the field or specific location that you want. For example, “#hartford #ct #jobs.” There are also folks out there doing all they can to help those who are unemployed find gainful employment. Try taking a look at #findajobfriday, #hirefriday, and #jobangels. [Tip: Twitter is a great tool in the job search because many recruiters will post a job opening on Twitter, which is free to use, before paying to post the opening on a job board. Therefore, you can learn about some openings before they’re even posted anywhere by watching for them on Twitter.]

How do I create a hashtag? Well, you create one by simply starting to use it. There’s no place to register a tag. You start using it, and invite your followers use it too. Over time, this leads to greater visibility, especially when you actively promote its use, like Brown Estate did by including the tag on their labels.

Sometimes, multiple hashtags appear that all relate to the same thing (like #job and #jobs, and #FollowFriday and #ff). Remember that the hashtag counts in your character count for your tweet. So, you want something short and sweet, but meaningful. Play around with searching for the hashtag you want to create. If it’s not in use, run with it and let others know what it means, and encourage them to use it too!

Finally, how do I search for a hashtag? Well, there are all sorts of ways to do that. You can use search.twitter.com to search for the hashtag. You can use the search box in Hootsuite and other applications. You can also use Tweetchat or Twubs to monitor conversations taking place around a given hashtag. (When you use Tweetchat, you have less than 140 characters to work with, because TweetChat automatically appends the tag you’re following to your tweet.)

How else can hashtags help me? You can also use other sites like BlastFollow to automatically follow everyone who’s using a particular hashtag. Or you can create an RSS feed of a hashtag for posting on your website or pulling into your Facebook newsfeed. You can use Storify to create a story out of a collection of posts for archiving and sharing purposes, and you can use TwapperKeeper to periodically archive hashtag posts so that nothing gets lost over time.

A hashtag by itself is a simple thing. But what you do with it is as rich and powerful as you make it. Promote your business. Find a job. Attend a conference. Learn something new. The choice is yours!

And when you share this post, try adding #Aleweb to it. Then see what everyone else is saying and join the conversation!


Deprecated: Directive 'allow_url_include' is deprecated in Unknown on line 0